Update on Black Walnut Gun Cabinet

black walnut gun cabinet glue up
Black Walnut Gun Cabinet Glue Up

(Thursday night) We got kicked out of the house!  Given that we’ve been banished, it seemed like an opportune time to update the blog.  Some of you have asked “Jerry, what’s up with the blog?”  Well, it’s three things.  First, I’ve been busy keeping the world safe for democracy in my day job.  Mrs Woodworker won’t let me retire, so we have 23 more months to go.  Second, Traughber Design has been swamped with orders, which is a good thing.  Third, we’ve been getting the house ready to sell so we can continue our minimalism journey.  That’s the reason we got kicked out of the house tonight:  our realtor told us to beat it for the open house.  That actually turned out to be a blessing since we caught up on our Five Guys addiction and it gave me some time to update you on the happenings at Traughber Design.

As far as those commissions, many thanks to Lisa Love for the furniture repair commission, Jeremy Wood for the woodturning commission, and neighbor Dave Strong for commissioning two home base footstools.  Dave also commissioned some baseball bat stools which we’re working on.  And a huge thank you to Dr Steve Ford for his gun cabinet commission (see our first post about that commission here).  Speaking of which…

The picture above shows the glue up we did today attaching the face frame of the gun cabinet to the cabinet itself.  Believe it or not, it took almost 40 hours to get to that point.  The cabinet involves over 70 pieces and it took some time to carefully select each piece to match grain and avoid knots in the raw boards.  In order to maximize efficiency, I cut all the 70 pieces at once so I didn’t have to keep switching back and forth between tools later.  Not that it wasn’t fun, though.  I enjoy letting the wood talk to me and tell me what each part wants to be.  It’s also important to finish sand certain parts before gluing since they won’t be accessible once they are glued together.  When finish sanding with three grits (80, 120, and 180) it takes some time.  Be sure you are not sanding where the joints glue together, however, or you won’t get a solid bond.  In the next step we’ll cut the two back panels which consist of black walnut plywood.  After that, we start working on the base molding and crown molding which will be three carefully routed pieces glued together in an intricate pattern.

While projects like Steve’s are drying, I flip over to the second project, in this case the baseball bat stool.  Thanks to Jacob Hummisch for his engineering prowess on this one.  We jerry rigged a frame to hold the bats  in place and to get the angles right for the stools.  Now I just need to drill the holes and dry fit everything together.  With any luck, I’ll post an update with pictures when that stool is done.

Did you set aside time for making today?

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