Choosing Woodworking Tools, or Why I Love Festool

Festool tools
Joy of Festool

I am so thankful I crossed paths with my pal, Steve Patoir, in Afghanistan.  He was a stark raving mad lunatic about some tools called Festool (check out their website at festoolusa.com) which I had never heard of.  I figured when I got back to the States, I’d give them a try and boy, am I glad I did.  I’ve been using Festool almost exclusively now for 2 years and they are worth every penny (that’s a lot of pennies, more on that in a minute).

If you are just starting out in woodworking, let me give you a few thoughts to ponder.  As Steve says:  “a cheap tool, is an expensive tool.”  Why is that?  Because if you buy a low-budget tool you don’t really want in the first place, you’re going to end up replacing it anyway.  In addition, it’s probably not going to last very long or do the job that you need it to do.  You need to think in terms of decades when you are buying tools.  Is this tool something you will enjoy using for the next 10, or 20 years?  If it frustrates you because of the way it’s designed, you’ve got the wrong tool.

So why are we such Festool fans?  Let me give you a few reasons:

Precision.  Once you’ve worked with the Festool mortise and tenon machine (Domino), sliding compound miter saw with laser (Kapex), and table saw equivalent (Track Saw), you can easily work within the millimeter precision window.  Festool has designed their gear to be incredibly easy to use and incredibly precise.  I’m still amazed and overjoyed to see that the cuts come out perfectly every single time.  When you are making something like the cornhole set we profiled in another post, precision is not quite so important, but when you are making something like a picture frame, it is very important.

Interoperability.  It wasn’t until I had built up a core group of Festool that I saw how interoperability equalled speed, which is crucial in a woodworking business.  You can quickly switch the dust collection hose and power cord from the dust collector to each power tool in seconds.  For example, on the gun cabinet project I found myself quickly transitioning from cutting pieces with the Track Saw and Kapex to cutting mortises with the Domino in no time at all.

Dust collection.  I go overboard when it comes to shop safety.  Why poke your eye out if you don’t have to?  Always wear hearing protection and eye protection.  In addition, all the dust floating around your shop can kill you (in the long run).  A dust collection system will keep all that floating crap out of your lungs and keep them healthy.  Festool has a great system that screens out fine particles and is easy to use.  Also, having the vacuum automatically turn on when you trigger the power tool is pretty slick.

And most importantly:  Joy.  Those German designers have thought about just about every situation a woodworker will encounter in using their tools.  Steve and I are still swapping stories about some ergonomic tool feature we had overlooked.  I absolutely love using these tools (also see our post about the gulag and craftsmanship joy) in the shop.

So you may be saying “Jerry, that’s great but Festool is really expensive!”.  You know what?  You’re right.  I saved up my deployment bonuses to buy my tools and my super sister bought me one of the more expensive Festool as a welcome home present.  You may not be so lucky, so consider buying one per year (or every other year if necessary) to spread out the pain.  I would NOT advise using a credit card to finance tool purchases.  Try to grow your hobby or business organically (more on that in one of the business-related posts which will be rolling out soon).  If you are going to go the Festool route, start with the smaller Domino.  You will use it a LOT and using mortise and tenon joinery to eliminate metal fasteners will set your work apart.  Then I’d get the TS55 Track Saw (the 55 means it can cut to a depth of 55mm) when you can afford it.

Do I only have Festool?  No.  I’m a big fan of Harbor Freight tools (harborfreight.com) because they are inexpensive and durable.  If you have an edge that’s not going to be visible to the client and will not sacrifice the quality of your joinery, then a HF tool may do the job.  For example, I have a HF bench top bandsaw.  You are never going to use a band saw to produce a finished edge on a piece since you will always be filing and sanding that band sawn edge.  Along those lines, I’ve got a HF bench top drill press which does the trick just fine.

The bottom line is it’s important to think about exactly what you are going to be doing in the shop then the appropriate tool that will allow you to do that task quickly and with precision.

For the experienced woodworkers out there.  What are your favorite tools and why?

2 thoughts on “Choosing Woodworking Tools, or Why I Love Festool”

  1. I am a big fan of Milwaukee tools. They are quality products that seem to last a long time as well.

    There are some guys in the neighborhood who love the Harbor Freight tools, too. The bench top bandsaw is pretty popular.

    1. I’ve heard great things about Milwaukee tools, but have never owned one of theirs. On a side note, it seems Milwaukee is quite the hub for woodworkers. Will have to check out some of the wood shops there next time we are in Wisconsin.

      BTW, I see in your comment form you have a website: colbyaviationthrillers.com. Let me know when your book comes out and I’ll post a link here.

      Thanks for the comment!

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