3 Entrepreneur Lessons Learned on My Woodworking Expedition to the Korean Furniture Museum

Korea Furniture Museum
Korea Furniture Museum

I just got back from a 6,000 mile woodworking expedition to the Korean Furniture Museum in Seoul and learned several valuable entrepreneur lessons I’d like to share with you.  OK, maybe that’s a stretch.  We went to Korea for my day job and had some time to kill before our return flight and took the opportunity to research some woodworking designs.  The mission’s intent was sound, but it quickly took some interesting turns.  Here are a few lessons learned from the expedition:

Lesson #1:  Surround Yourself with Positive, Like-Minded People

Given our government-mandated return flight time, we had some time to kill in Seoul, so I figured I’d tour the Korean Furniture Museum for some design ideas.  The Lonely Planet Guide for Seoul recommended it and it seemed interesting.  One of my colleagues, Rich Davis (see interview with him here), tagged along since we are both on artisan journeys:  mine in woodworking and Rich’s in photography.  Our first task was to figure out the Korean subway system.  I’d ridden it a few years ago, but was a little rusty.  Fortunately, the digital kiosks had an English option and we were able to quickly purchase a couple tickets and be on our way.  A couple subway stops later we got off and started walking toward the museum which the Guide said was on a beautiful hilltop location.  It was a pretty warm day and as we climbed, and climbed, and climbed we realized we weren’t seeing any more signs for the museum and were lost (more on that in #2 below).

At this point, Rich could have started cussing me out, but he understood it was all part of the journey.  If I hadn’t had him along, I might have thrown in the towel and headed back to the subway station.  That’s why it’s important to surround yourself with like-minded people.  They will encourage you to keep pressing on.

Lesson #2:  People Want to Help You

So there we were, lost in Seoul, but we saw a police “box” which is an extremely small outpost for a policeman or two to stand in.  I figured “what’s the worst that can happen” and went to ask for directions.  The two Korean policemen were extremely young, maybe around 18, and I had no idea if they spoke English.  Luckily, even though they didn’t think so, their English was very good.  One of them even drew a map on my guide book to the museum.  We followed his map and ran into another police box.  The policeman there gave us the final directions and we finally made it to the museum.

I’ve traveled to at least two dozen countries and have found that people, in general, are very friendly and are willing to help you out.  This is a good lesson for entrepreneurs:  if you are stuck, ask for help.

Lesson #3:  Never Quit

We got the museum and asked the security guard about tickets.  He made a chopping motion with one arm against his forearm.  He was either a Seminoles fan or something was amiss.  He was on older gentleman who didn’t speak any English and flagged down a co-worker.  She told us the museum was closed!  According to the guidebook, we were there during normal hours, but apparently they were going through some renovations or something.  Rich and I laughed it off and starting heading back down the hill.  We went back to our hotel and rehydrated with a couple of cold ones.  Rich was able to climb the hill near the hotel at sunset and snap some cool time lapse photographs from the old city wall, so the day wasn’t a total loss.

This could have been a very disappointing afternoon, but the way we looked at, it was just one event in a very long journey to create.  In addition, we’re likely to go back to Korea again next year and can give it another shot.

There you have it:  surround yourself with like-minded people, ask for help when you need it, and never quit.  And by the way, if you are ever in Seoul, please let me know how the Korean Furniture Museum is ; )

How To Cut Your Work Hours 40% to Focus on Making: Interview with Writer and Award Winning Photographer Lisa Traughber

Entrepreneur:  “a person who organizes and manages any enterprise, especially business, usually with considerable initiative and risk.”  (dictionary.com)

Lisa Traughber, Award Winning Nature Photographer
Lisa Traughber, Award Winning Nature Photographer

This interview is our fifth in a series of interviews with entrepreneurs and makers, this time with magazine writer, blogger, and photographer Lisa Traughber, the Best-Sister-In-The-Whole-World.  Lisa has been published in multiple magazines and also won several photography awards.  Our readers may find her move to slash her work hours in order to create very interesting.

Thank you for doing the interview.  You have many creative talents and I think our readers will be interested in how you were able redesign your life to shift your time from working to making.  You only work 3 days per week and spend 2 days per week creating:  writing for magazines, blogging, and doing photography.  You made that shift some time ago, and how you made that shift might be very interesting to our readers.

You’re welcome.  Thank you for your interest.

You started with writing for magazines and have had several articles published.  Tell us a little about how you got started.

I took a week long class a number of years ago that was devoted to writing articles for inspirational magazines.  The class was held at the beautiful Glen Eyrie located in Colorado Springs.  The class taught me everything I needed to know to properly submit articles for publication.

How were you able to go from 5 work days per week to 3?

I changed job locations within the same organization.  The location change was the right time to cut down my work hours so I could pursue other things. The change also gave me more time to spend with my family. The people in administration at the organization were happy because they wanted someone who would be flexible with their hours when they opened the new location.

Was that a difficult transition?

It was a very easy transition.  I simplified my expenses and had my mortgage and car paid off, so I had more freedom in cutting down my work hours.

Tell us a little about the focus of your blog.

My blog is specific to nature at the Horicon Marsh in Wisconsin.  This includes the Horicon National Wildlife Refuge and the Horicon Marsh State Wildlife Area.  My blog focuses on wildlife and plants along with talking about photography.  My main goal is to share the beauty, creativity, and artistry found in nature.

How did you get started in photography?

I have been interested in photography since I was in high school.  I set up shots around the house and took pictures in the yard.  Later, two of my favorite subjects were (and still are) my niece and nephew.

You’ve won some awards.  What does it take to get to that level?

It takes practice and study.  I have taken thousands of poor photos.  That part is necessary to arrive at an exceptional photo.  I have also taken online classes and done a lot of reading.  That has been helpful in learning the technical aspects of photography that can improve a photo.  I am still learning and I share mistakes with my readers so they can learn with me.

The blog is something new you added in 2016.  How is that going?

The blog is going well.  I want to do at least one post per week.  This motivates me to get out and shoot regularly.  The blog is a wonderful outlet for me to work on my photography and writing skills.  I have new readers checking it out every week.

How often do you write?

I write for the blog at least once a week.  I also write in a journal occasionally.  My focus is on the blog rather than writing magazine articles now. I enjoy the creative freedom that writing for a blog provides. When you write for magazines, you have to follow their writer’s guidelines.  You may also receive more rejection letters than acceptance letters.  That becomes discouraging.  When you write for a blog, you may receive immediate feedback and, in my experience, it has been encouraging.  Bloggers are often good cheerleaders for each other.

What have you learned on your blogging journey?

Prior to starting the blog, I took the class “Creating WordPress Websites” through Moraine Park Technical College.  It is a 6 week online class.  I learned everything I needed to know to get a website up and running.  Knowledgeable instructors answered all of my questions.  I highly recommend it.

Any big plans for 2017?

I plan to take the class “Writing Effective Web Content” (www.ed2go.com/mptc) to help me to develop my writing skills.  I also plan to watch a photography DVD series I purchased a while back to improve my photography skills.

Tell us a little bit about your creative process.

My blog is photography driven.  I will go for a drive or hike at the Horicon Marsh and whatever happens to be there that day can become the subject for my blog.  I develop the written content from the photos.  I try to include interesting, educational content as well as personal insights.  At times, I will decide to look for something specific, like macro shots. I may also talk about the process of taking the photo if I think it is helpful for my readers.

What advice do you have for beginning bloggers or photographers?

I recommend taking classes, reading, and talking to other bloggers and photographers.  You can avoid a lot of mistakes by learning what has worked for others.

Where can we learn more about your photography?

The best place you can learn about my photography is at the blog, horiconmarshnaturephotgraphy.com.

Anything else you’d like to share with our readers?

Don’t be afraid to jump in and start your own blog.  It is a great opportunity to learn and to meet others who share the same interests.

Thank you, Lisa!

For our other posts in the entrepreneur interview series:

Amazon best selling author Lawrence Colby, write of The Devil Dragon Pilot:  Part 1 and Part 2.  Colby has finished his draft of his second book, The Black Scorpion Pilot.  Stay tuned for another interview with him after the book is available on Amazon.

Amazing photographer Richard Weldon Davis.

Successful entrepreneur and owner of Custom Display Cases, Mo Johnson: Part 1Part 2Part 3, and Part 4.

Incredible baker and entrepreneur, Haleigh Heard.

Stay tuned for our next interview in the entrepreneur series!

 

Interview with Entrepreneur and Photographer Richard Weldon Davis

the jefferson memorial
The Jefferson Memorial

This interview is part of a series of interviews with fellow entrepreneurs.  Our first was with a best-selling author.  In this interview, photographer Richard Weldon Davis shares some of his methods and secrets to success.  Read on!

How did you get started in photography?
 
I was on vacation with my wife celebrating our 20th wedding anniversary about 6 years ago.  We hired a photographer to take pictures of our vow renewal ceremony.  I started asking the photographer about the camera as I had become intrigued with the idea of buying a DSLR (digital single-lens reflex) camera (think digital version of a 35mm camera).  I bought one when we got home and I started taking pictures using the automatic mode, allowing the camera to make all the decisions for me.  For the most part I was disappointed in the shots.  They just weren’t coming out the way I envisioned them.  This went on for a couple years and I didn’t use the camera much.
 
the washington monument at night
The Washington Monument

During a visit to some old friends, both of whom are excellent photographers, I asked for help.  They both worked with me to show me how to take pictures in manual mode and select the Shutter Speed, ISO (think film speed) and Aperture myself.  They patiently explained what selections to make for which shots I wanted.  They also showed me the basics of photo editing in Lightroom, a program from Adobe related to Photoshop.

With this new information in hand I began to experiment with the 3 sides of the exposure triangle (Shutter Speed, ISO and Aperture) to get different shots.  I’m still learning every day, but now I make the camera do what I want instead of allowing the camera to decide.  In order to understand the exposure triangle, think of the camera as a room (that’s actually what the word means in Latin!) and the lens is a window.  To illuminate the room, you open the window.  How long the window is open is the Shutter Speed, how big the window is is the Aperture and how much light you have is the ISO (sensitivity to light).  So for an action shot of kids on the soccer field, you want a very quick Shutter Speed to freeze the action.  For a night photo of stars, you want a long shutter speed to gather more of the starlight for your shot.
 
I was lucky enough to go on one of your shoots as your “assistant” and it was impressive to watch how much effort you put into getting just the right shot.  Tell us a little bit about your creative process.
the golden gate bridge
The Golden Gate Bridge

I really enjoy landscape photography.  You and I were in San Francisco for work and I really wanted a nice shot of the Golden Gate Bridge while we were there.  In general, the best times of day to shoot outdoors is the period of twilight early in the morning at dawn or late dusk when the sunlight takes on a blue hue.  That’s why I dragged you to Baker’s Beach an hour or so before sunset.  I was hoping for a nice blue effect right after sunset.  It turned out pretty nice and I appreciate you humoring me hanging on the beach dodging a random nudist.

night stars
Night Stars

I’m also a big fan of night photography.  I love the way different lights are captured by the camera; from the starburst effect of streetlights during a long exposure to the streaks of red and white lights from cars driving by to capturing the stars that outline the Milky Way galaxy, I really enjoy longer exposures (can’t get that shot in light polluted DC!).

No matter your shot, the key to photography is understanding and harnessing the light, whether it is sunlight, a flash, or starlight travelling for thousands of years to light your scene.
I’ve begun to dabble with portrait photography and that is fun as well.  Again it comes down to light.
 
What lessons learned do you have for other budding entrepreneurs?
 
I’m not much of an entrepreneur yet, but for those exploring photography with a DSLR camera, the equipment is secondary, you need to shoot in manual and learn how to make the exposure triangle work for you.  It helps to look at photographs online where the artist has listed Shutter Speed, ISO and Aperture so you can dissect their shot and figure out how they did it.  You can also find great resources online to better understand your camera and its functions.  Don’t be discouraged if your shots don’t look as good as those you find online, just keep shooting.  Figure out what kind of photography you like and how to differentiate yourself from other photographers.
 
Also, what’s a good link where we can buy your prints?
My best shots are available at Fine Art America:
I also have a sometimes updated blog at http://chartprepping.com/ where I write about early retirement and my hobbies to include photography.
sandals resort
Sandals Resort
 Thanks so much for the interview Jerry!