Product Review: Granberg Alaskan Mark IV Portable Chain Saw Mill

Granberg Sawmill
Granberg Saw Mill

How cool would it be to mill your own wood directly from the source?  Very cool, indeed.  I had the opportunity to do just that the other day when fellow woodworker, Jacob Hummitzsch, and I tried out the Granberg Mark IV Alaskan Portable Chain Saw Mill to cut some slabs out of a downed white oak nearby.  If you are considering sourcing your own wood, I highly recommend it.  Here is some of the intel on the Granberg:

 

Advantages

White Oak from Sawmill
White Oak from Sawmill

End Result.  As you can see from the picture at the left, there is minimal waviness in the boards we cut.  If you use a large bandsaw, which is typical for this kind of work, there can be some pretty significant waves in the wood to deal with.  The slabs we cut with the Granberg should be very easy to plane.  The boards we cut were as large as 16 inches across and my planer can only handle 12 inches, so if I want to keep the entire width would need to take the boards to a hardwood dealer or sawyer for planing, OR I could build a rig using a router to plane the wood.  I’ll likely go the router route at some point in the future when I get more into making table tops.

Granberg in Action
Granberg in Action

Ease of Use.  Once we got the hang of it, cutting slabs was a breeze.  You just lean forward and rock the saw a bit from side to side, so the entire saw blade is not engaged with the log and it’s easier on the chainsaw to make the cut.  The Granberg can easily be maneuvered by one person, but it’s a good idea to have a Wingman tapping in wedges behind you to keep the void behind the saw open as you cut.  It’s also good to have a Wingman to alternate cutting slabs with you because it does get tiring.

Cost.  In only 2 hours we cut six boards which were 1.5 inches thick, 16 inches wide, and 64 inches long.  That works out to about 65 board feet.  The last time I bought white oak (which I selected and costs more), it was $9.90 per board foot.  Jacob’s and my little expedition netted over $600 in retail white oak with a couple caveats.  One caveat is that our wood is not kiln dried and will require some time and space to dry out.  Another caveat is that the white oak I purchased was S2S grade (read our post here about wood grades), and the slabs we cut will need some additional milling, particularly planing.  However, for the cost of the Granberg and the chain saw we saved hundreds of dollars.  Over several years, this could add up to thousands saved.  If you read our post on pricing your work, you can see that sharply reducing your expenses over the long haul can really add up.  Could Mrs Woodworker be right when she says she saves money when she goes shopping?  Nah.

Controlling entire supply chain.  There is a lot to be said for sourcing your own wood, since you are controlling the level of quality from start to finish.  In addition, you can select trees with unique characteristics, and dry them in a method you know and trust.  You can also be more selective in which boards are used for which purpose which is an important aspect of craftsmanship.  In building our current commission, the black walnut gun cabinet, it was important to have half a dozen raw 8 foot boards to choose from so I could match grain and color for different parts of the cabinet. If you are sourcing your own wood, you will have a much larger selection of grain and color to choose from.

Cons

Stability at Beginning and End of Cut.  One of the disadvantages we saw was that when you first start cutting and when are at the end of the cut, the saw can flop around a bit because there is not as much of the frame to rest on the log.  Once the saw gets going, the entire frame is resting on the log.  There may be extensions available to mitigate this, but we didn’t have any and had to eyeball it a bit to make sure the saw was horizontal.

Sawmill with Chainsaw
Sawmill with Chainsaw

Saw Sharpening.  This is not really the Granberg’s fault, but we had to sharpen the saw after every two boards, or so.  We sharpened it by hand, and can probably speed this up with an electric sharpener.  There are four bolts to loosen, so freeing then tightening the saw did not take too long.  It’s important to take the time to sharpen the saw, or you’ll be wasting your time over the long haul (see our post about efficiency and sharpening the saw here).  Here is a link to some sharpeners available on Amazon.

Storage.  As you can imagine, storing many boards that are around a foot wide and eight feet long will take up a lot of space.  Given that my current shop is in half of the garage, I don’t have much room for storage.  If you have some land, this may not be an issue and you could store your wood in a shed, or outside if it is covered with a tarp.

If you’re looking to mill a lot of wood, for example to build a house, a larger portable saw mill like a Wood Mizer might be more appropriate.  Jesse and Alyssa at Pure Living For Life have a great video on their experience with using one of these larger mills (in this case, the Wood Mizer LT15).  Click here for the video.  We referenced their journey in our post on the RSS hack and they seem to be making a lot of progress in their journey to living off-grid and debt free.

Overall, I’d give a “buy” recommendation for the Granberg.  It was a lot of fun to use and can save a serious woodworker hundreds, and maybe thousands, of dollars in the long run.

Time is Not Finite! How to Create Time for Life and Your Entrepreneurial Ventures

No great thing is created suddenly, any more than a bunch of grapes or a fig. If you tell me that you desire a fig, I answer you that there must be time. Let it first blossom, then bear fruit, then ripen.

Epictetus – Discourses Chap. xv

Cut the Cable!
Cut the Cable!

I used to think that time is finite, but have since learned that’s not true. We can create time.  If you are an entrepreneur, or would like to be an entrepreneur and have a dream you are pursuing, you must create time to devote to it, just as the philosopher Epictetus said that we need to allow time for that fig to grow.

Let me share three ways you can create time:

 

Cut the cable

As we wrote about earlier regarding Stoicism and having correct perceptions, we can change our perception of time to trick our brains into thinking there is more of it by reducing stimuli, in particular, eliminating TV.  Did you know the average American watches 5 hours of TV per day according to the New York Daily News!  By eliminating TV you are creating 5 hours per day, 35 hours per week, or almost 2,000 hours per year!  That’s the equivalent of a full time job (in France).  Not only that, while you are watching TV, the minutes seem to be racing by, but when you eliminate TV time slows down, or at least appears to slow down.  You’ve tricked your brain into thinking you have more time.  So how specifically can you go about it?

My pal Rich Davis turned me onto a blog by a guy called Mr Money Mustache (view his blog here) whose primary focus is sharing lessons learned for achieving financial independence.  MMM, as he’s called, advocates cutting your cable for primarily financial reasons, but my opinion is that the primary reason is to create time, with the ancillary benefit of reaping huge financial savings over time.  I decided to pursue MMM’s advice because we weren’t watching cable much and were paying $180 per month to Verizon.  No matter how much I negotiated with Verizon and cut services the price always moved back up to what I was paying before.  So Mrs Woodworker and I decided to cut both cable and the phone landline to see what would happen.  We had stopped answering the landline because almost all the calls we were receiving were telemarketers, so why pay Verizon for a service we weren’t using?  Anyway, our Verizon bills with the bundles (Internet, phone, and cable) were $180 before we cut the cord.  Now we are paying $85 per month, which is a net savings of about $100 per month, almost $1200 per year, or $12,000 (!) over 10 years.  There is one major drawback which we haven’t fully mitigated, however.

How do we watch our favorite professional and college sports?  I think we’ve cracked the code on pro sports, but college sports are a work on progress.  I was finding that the ending of NFL games were so late here on the East Coast, that I needed a workaround.  A couple years ago I started subscribing to NFL GamePass ($99.99 per year) which allows you to watch all NFL games via replay.  I get up for work at 0430 (remember Traughber Design is a part-time business for now) and if an NFL game doesn’t get over until 0100, that’s only 3 1/2 hours of sleep.  That’s not a sustainable model.  With NFL GamePass I can just watch the game the following night and get 8 hours of sleep (or close to it).

College games are a bit trickier, but I’m finding more games are starting to be streamed on the Internet live and that ESPN is starting to show many games via replay on their website.  A fallback option is to Google the closest watering hole that is showing your favorite college team’s games.  I always feel obligated to keep ordering things while I’m there, since I’m receiving the benefit of watching the game in their establishment, so this can be an expensive option.  Another option is to “invite yourself” to your friends’ (thank you, Kevin Hanson) houses ; )

Truth in advertising here…does that mean we watch absolutely no TV?  Of course not.  We’re not Luddites.  We’ve got Netflix for $9.99 per month and now we purchase about two TV series per year on iTunes (of course, we have to keep up with The Walking Dead).  Each series runs about $30 for a season, which means we are netting over $1000 per year, or over $10,000 over 10 years versus cable.  That’s a whole lot of power tools!

So…you can create time by cutting cable.  How else can you create time?

Do a cost/benefit analysis of Amazon Prime Versus Running Errands

We signed up for Amazon Prime about a year ago as an experiment.  I looked at our orders over the preceding year and we didn’t have enough orders to justify the $99 annual fee, but I wanted to experiment with it (See our post about failing fast and cheap.  This was an inexpensive experiment) to see what all the hubbub was about.  There’s no surprise given the clever mind of Jeff Bezos that we are purchasing more from Amazon than we had before, because it’s so convenient.  That’s not necessarily a bad thing, if we were going to purchase those things anyway.  Where Prime really comes in handy is in creating time by having packages shipped to your house if they are the same price in the local store.  You’ve just created the amount of time required to do that round trip to the local store by ordering via Prime, not to mention the time to stand in line.  To give you an example, recently Mrs Woodworker’s headlight went out.  I was going to run to Advance Auto Parts and buy another bulb.  Then I got to thinking “I wonder what the price is on Amazon?”  Sure enough, the price was about the same.  Now if Mrs Woodworker was going to be doing night driving, I would have gone straight away to buy the bulb to keep her safe.  She was only going to be driving during the day for the next 2 days, so I ordered on Amazon and the bulb showed up 2 days later.  I had just created 40 minutes of time (20 minutes each way, plus any additional time standing in line).

Jeff Bezos just helped you create some time, how else can you do it?

Stop Doing Something

It’s important we evaluate our to-do lists from time to time to make sure we’re not doing things we don’t need to be doing.  I tried to zero in on things that were repetitive which would mean large time savings over the long haul.  One of those things was paying bills.  We’ve been paying bills online via our bank for a long time, but were too lazy to fully automate the process.  Before you pay one more bill, go to the company’s website and sign up for autopay.  You will never have to write another check or facilitate another payment again.  I figure I was spending at least 15 minutes every Saturday paying bills.  I just created 12 hours per year.  Now we just get an E-mail every month stating when our card was charged and by how much.  In addition, I’m using that wonderful Naval Federal Credit Union (NFCU) Visa card that pays 1.5% cash back (thanks Gareth Embrey for the recommendation).

Another great way to eliminate errands is to leverage Craigslist and Freecycle.  People will actually come to your house and pay you for your stuff if you use Craigslist!  Think about how many trips to the dump or donation center that will eliminate.  If I post something on Craigslist and it doesn’t sell, then I usually post it on Freecycle.  For example, as I mentioned in the post about moving the wood shop, we are getting ready to move.  Our realtor recommended replacing two old ceiling fans and an old light fixture with three ceiling fans, which I just finished installing.  I posted the old fans on Craigslist, but they didn’t sell so I posted them on Freecycle.  A very nice lady came and took them away.  Bam!  I just saved the time it would have taken to get rid of them, and she got three fixtures for free.

What else is there on your to-do list that you can eliminate or automate?

Well, that’s enough temporal philosophy so I’d better call it a day and head down to the wood shop.

Thinking about cutting the cord?  Go for it!

For other Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures on managing time, check out our post here.

 

The Devil Dragon Pilot Rockets to #1 on Amazon! Interview Update with Entrepreneur and Amazon Best Selling Author, Lawrence Colby

Interview with Amazon Best Selling Author Lawrence Colby, Author of The Devil Dragon Pilot
Interview with Author Lawrence Colby

Thank you for doing a follow up interview and congratulations on achieving Amazon Best Seller status!  Your book, The Devil Dragon Pilot, is now #1 in its category (Aviation) on Amazon.  That didn’t take very long, so your book must be very popular.  There was a lot of interest in the first interview and we received several follow up questions.  Here are some of the questions from our readers.

“I would enjoy hearing more about his writing process.  How did he keep motivated to get up at 4:00 am.?”

Getting up that early is relatively easy for me. I had a job at the Pentagon a few years ago where I had to be at work no later than 6 AM. I also had to read four or five newspapers every morning, scan all the news websites, and then be ready to intelligently discuss the world events with a senior Defense Department official. With no emails to answer, no one asking questions, I can crank out a lot in an hour or so in the morning. I also fit in marathon training, and just completed my eighth race. You’d be surprised what you can do.
“Did he ever deal with writer’s block?” 

Running helps me think through storylines. Sometimes I will use Dragon dictation, an app for my phone, and talk into it while I am driving. Plus, driving through Washington DC enables me to see the real world buildings, which link to the storylines. For example, I’ve visited Georgetown University this weekend, and now that’s in the next book titled “The Black Scorpion”. I find if I change the scenery, I don’t get writers block.

“How did he come up with his story?” 

The idea was brewing around in my head for a while because I couldn’t find anything that focused on someone in the Air Force Reserve. No movies, no books. Therefore, I created Ford Stevens, our hero pilot from Air Force Reserve.

“Has he always had an interest in writing?”
Yes, I have written and published a few military related articles in different professional military publications. This was my first attempt at a novel. I am an avid reader, reading both fiction and nonfiction, and always have been since a kid. Now on to novel number two!
(Jerry) I’ve got a few questions of my own.  What advice do you have for beginning entrepreneurs?

I like to try different things that perhaps people have not seen or done before. Sometimes I will connect a service or product from one industry, and connect it with another. I will see things in different countries across the world, and wonder if it would be a good idea in the United States.

The creative thinking aspect and entrepreneurial spirit really thrills me.  For example, I started my company Mach278 when I came up with an idea for colored surgical sponges. The sponges, if ever manufactured, would help solve the severe problem in medicine of preventing retained surgical items. The concept of colored surgical sponges is a cross between patient safety and aviation safety.
What is next as far as events for marketing the first book?

I’ve done a variety of print and web interviews, podcasts, and have had plenty of friends utilize social media. I also have an upcoming book signing at the Marine Corps exchange, Henderson Hall, Washington DC, on Dec 17th. There is also plan in the works to do book signings at Barnes and Noble stores in Northern Virginia.

Can you tell us anything about the second book and when it might be released?

Book 2 is titled “The Black Scorpion” and will feature many of the same characters from the book one. Ford Stevens, Emily Livingston, Mark Savona, and the rest of the crew will be back. It will be a story of human endurance and survival, related to aviation. Super exciting. It will be out summer 2017.

With all of your readers help, I am now ranked #1 on Amazon in Aviation.
Thank you for your time, Jerry. I appreciate your support very much.
Colby’s story is an amazing example of grit as we’ve written about previously.  Can you imagine?  His book was just released around Veterans Day and is already at or near the top in several categories on Amazon.  If he can do it, imagine what you can do?
If you’d like to check out the latest and greatest for Devil Dragon marketing events in your area, click on Colby’s blog here.

 

Juggle Several Balls at the Same Time: Maximizing Efficiency in the Wood Shop and as an Entrepreneur

black walnut keyring holder in progress
Black Walnut Keyring Holder in Progress

An effective woodworker always wants to have at least two projects going on simultaneously in the wood shop.  Why?  In order to maximize efficiency.  If you are woodworking as a part-time gig, as I am, there is all the more reason to make every minute count as we discussed in the blog on making and managing.  There is not a minute to spare when you are working a full time job during the day and working in the wood shop on nights and weekends.  Let’s get into the mechanics.

 

How does it work?  

Woodworking by its nature entails a lot of waiting during certain portions of the build such as glueing or waiting for finish to dry.  It’s important to take advantage of these pauses to flip to another project(s).  For example, once a glue up has been done on one project, why wait for the glue to dry when you can just pick up where you left off with the other piece?  Another example is once you’ve applied finish to the first project, flip over to the second project.  However, it’s important to consider that if you are doing finish work on the first project, make sure the second project is not going to generate dust that will settle onto your finish on the first project.  A way to mitigate that risk is to rig a dust shroud around the first project while the finish is drying or to take the second project outside.  If you are looking for more information on finishing, check out our post on the cherry coat rack project or Marc Spagnuolo’s DVD on finishing at The Wood Whisperer.

What if I don’t have a commission right now?

If you are between commissions, I’m sure Mrs. Woodworker or your significant other is looking for something that needs to be made around the house.  These projects are great for continuing to build your skill set.  In addition, this valuable shop time may spark an idea for another project.

Another approach is to build something that doesn’t take a lot of time that you know sells well.  For example, it only takes me about 3 1/2 hours to build a corn hole set and I always like to have one set available in case a client wants one.  If I have some dead time and don’t currently have a set ready, I know that time is well spent to get another one built.  In general, I don’t like to build on spec as I’ve written about earlier, but if I know that something has sold in the past and is likely to sell again, then it’s pretty low risk to build another one.

Another reason to have multiple balls in the air applies to entrepreneurship in general.  If you get stuck in one area you can always shift focus to another area.  For example, if I don’t have a lot of work in the shop I can always spend more time working on the blog, or vice versa. We were working four commissions at once not too long ago, so I spent a little less time on the blog until we caught up in the wood shop.  You can extend that concept to entrepreneurship in general.  No matter what your business is, it likely involves sales.  If sales are slow, you can shift focus to other value-added tasks in the business that don’t involve sales.  If you are swamped with sales, you can shift to fulfilling orders until you catch up or hire more staff.

Better opportunity for flow

prayer kneeler in cherry and black walnut
Prayer Kneeler in Cherry and Black Walnut

When you have multiple projects there is also less starting and stopping in the shop and this can be less jarring to your system.  You are always seamlessly transitioning from one project to the other and it’s just part of your normal routine.  In addition, there is also a greater chance for serendipity.  You may learn something on one project that benefits the other.  For example, on one project I was contrasting light and dark woods, which gave me an idea to try the same thing on a prayer kneeler I was building (see picture to left). That wasn’t in the original design, but I went with the flow and I think it turned out pretty well as you can see in the picture.

Increase production.  If woodworking is your business, you need to be continuously producing and delivering in order to bring in revenue (you especially need to be producing if it’s on your honey-do list).  Advertising completed projects on social media generates new bids, which generates more production, which generates more advertising and bids.  It’s a  virtuous cycle.  In addition, increased production means you can build things quicker at the same level of quality and either pass on your costs savings to your clients (see our blog post about pricing for more information on what is reasonable to charge clients) which will make you more competitive, or you may decide to increase your profits, or both.

What efficiency hacks work well in your shop?

 

Get Out of the Rat Race: How to Manage the Transition from Career to Maker

small business lessons learned
Building the Small Business

Tired of the rat race?  Ready to get off that hamster wheel?  Being a maker (like a woodworker, for instance) can be incredibly rewarding.  It’s not easy to get there, but the rewards are incredible freedom and limitless creativity.

 

There are many paths to success, but I’ll share what has worked for Traughber Design.  We’re currently in a position of having as much business as we can handle as a part-time (see blog post #1) enterprise.  We’ve delivered two commissions in the past couple weeks, are currently working on a dining room chair commission, and are about to ink three deals on more projects.  This was after 2 years of effort, though, and we’ve learned some things along the way.

If you’re contemplating such a journey or have already retired, the following principles may help.

You have some amount of time every day you can devote to making.  Everyone’s situation is different, but you can get up early, stay up late, or shoe horn in a few minutes before or after dinner.  That amount of time depends on how badly you want to succeed with the transition.  I experimented with multiple approaches over 2 years and found that allocating a set amount of time every day worked best for me.  I’m currently setting aside 90 minutes every day split in two pieces (more on that below) since I’m about 2 years away from retirement and want to ensure this endeavor supports my family before then.

Along those lines, another key ingredient for success is to just get in the shop.  Some days I get tired and don’t feel like it, but I drag my sorry butt down to the wood shop.   Once I get started I’m energized again and more often than not, find myself in the zone (or flow).

Another strategy is to get up a little earlier every day.  As we learned in our interview with an Amazon Best Selling author and entrepeneur in a future post, getting up early every day before someone’s day job is a way to squeeze in some regular making time.

Split time between making and managing.  I owe a great debt of gratitude to Paul Graham, the founder of Y Combinator, which many view as the pre-eminent start-up incubator in the world.  Graham wrote a great blog post in 2009 called Maker’s Schedule, Manager’s Schedule about the difference between making and managing.  Making to me means unfettered time in the wood shop to create or time to write blog posts.  Managing is all the associated functions like drafting proposals for clients, filing taxes, etc. and includes everything not making. I allocate 60 minutes minimum for making and 30 minutes for managing every day (remember I’m doing this part-time for now).  Sometimes life happens (Back to School Night for one of our kids, for example) and I don’t get to spend any time in the shop, but that is the exception rather than the rule.  If I can’t get the full hour in the shop, I try to spend whatever time will allow.

An hour per day for a year is extremely powerful!  I take Sundays off, and 1 hour per day, 6 days per week over the course of a year comes out to 312 hours.  That is a ton of woodworking projects.  The gun cabinet project took 100 hours, but most projects are in the 10 to 20 hour range.  That means you can potentially crank out around a dozen projects in a year with only 1 hour in the shop per day.  If you leverage holidays and weekends while you are still in a career, you can accelerate your making that much more.

Another very important concept to consider is efficiency.  Between the times I’m in the shop, I’m thinking about how I’m going to use that hour the most effectively.  In addition, I write down exactly what I’m going to do with the 30 minutes of managing time. As I’ve told our kids a million times, “plan the attack and attack the plan.” It’s amazing how you can quickly move through your tasks during managing time when you’ve written them down.  For example, my goal was to spend 30 minutes per night going through a WordPress class this summer, but I found if I focused, it didn’t take 30 minutes every night.  If I had extra time, then I moved on to drafting blog posts, like this one.  I could not have been that efficient if I hadn’t written down what I wanted to achieve in those 30 minutes.

Start your side business now while you have income from your primary career.  Building a business takes a very long time.  I’ve been at this for almost 2 years now and am just now at the point where the commissions are rolling in on a regular basis.  I’m confident this will work.  You want to build enough revenue that you can be confident your small business will be a going concern before you jump ship from your primary career.  In addition, you can build all the start-up infrastructure (company registration, insurance, website, tools, etc.) you need so that when you do transition you can focus on making and continue to build your client base.

Already made the transition?  Share your lessons learned below!