How To Cut Your Work Hours 40% to Focus on Making: Interview with Writer and Award Winning Photographer Lisa Traughber

Entrepreneur:  “a person who organizes and manages any enterprise, especially business, usually with considerable initiative and risk.”  (dictionary.com)

Lisa Traughber, Award Winning Nature Photographer
Lisa Traughber, Award Winning Nature Photographer

This interview is our fifth in a series of interviews with entrepreneurs and makers, this time with magazine writer, blogger, and photographer Lisa Traughber, the Best-Sister-In-The-Whole-World.  Lisa has been published in multiple magazines and also won several photography awards.  Our readers may find her move to slash her work hours in order to create very interesting.

Thank you for doing the interview.  You have many creative talents and I think our readers will be interested in how you were able redesign your life to shift your time from working to making.  You only work 3 days per week and spend 2 days per week creating:  writing for magazines, blogging, and doing photography.  You made that shift some time ago, and how you made that shift might be very interesting to our readers.

You’re welcome.  Thank you for your interest.

You started with writing for magazines and have had several articles published.  Tell us a little about how you got started.

I took a week long class a number of years ago that was devoted to writing articles for inspirational magazines.  The class was held at the beautiful Glen Eyrie located in Colorado Springs.  The class taught me everything I needed to know to properly submit articles for publication.

How were you able to go from 5 work days per week to 3?

I changed job locations within the same organization.  The location change was the right time to cut down my work hours so I could pursue other things. The change also gave me more time to spend with my family. The people in administration at the organization were happy because they wanted someone who would be flexible with their hours when they opened the new location.

Was that a difficult transition?

It was a very easy transition.  I simplified my expenses and had my mortgage and car paid off, so I had more freedom in cutting down my work hours.

Tell us a little about the focus of your blog.

My blog is specific to nature at the Horicon Marsh in Wisconsin.  This includes the Horicon National Wildlife Refuge and the Horicon Marsh State Wildlife Area.  My blog focuses on wildlife and plants along with talking about photography.  My main goal is to share the beauty, creativity, and artistry found in nature.

How did you get started in photography?

I have been interested in photography since I was in high school.  I set up shots around the house and took pictures in the yard.  Later, two of my favorite subjects were (and still are) my niece and nephew.

You’ve won some awards.  What does it take to get to that level?

It takes practice and study.  I have taken thousands of poor photos.  That part is necessary to arrive at an exceptional photo.  I have also taken online classes and done a lot of reading.  That has been helpful in learning the technical aspects of photography that can improve a photo.  I am still learning and I share mistakes with my readers so they can learn with me.

The blog is something new you added in 2016.  How is that going?

The blog is going well.  I want to do at least one post per week.  This motivates me to get out and shoot regularly.  The blog is a wonderful outlet for me to work on my photography and writing skills.  I have new readers checking it out every week.

How often do you write?

I write for the blog at least once a week.  I also write in a journal occasionally.  My focus is on the blog rather than writing magazine articles now. I enjoy the creative freedom that writing for a blog provides. When you write for magazines, you have to follow their writer’s guidelines.  You may also receive more rejection letters than acceptance letters.  That becomes discouraging.  When you write for a blog, you may receive immediate feedback and, in my experience, it has been encouraging.  Bloggers are often good cheerleaders for each other.

What have you learned on your blogging journey?

Prior to starting the blog, I took the class “Creating WordPress Websites” through Moraine Park Technical College.  It is a 6 week online class.  I learned everything I needed to know to get a website up and running.  Knowledgeable instructors answered all of my questions.  I highly recommend it.

Any big plans for 2017?

I plan to take the class “Writing Effective Web Content” (www.ed2go.com/mptc) to help me to develop my writing skills.  I also plan to watch a photography DVD series I purchased a while back to improve my photography skills.

Tell us a little bit about your creative process.

My blog is photography driven.  I will go for a drive or hike at the Horicon Marsh and whatever happens to be there that day can become the subject for my blog.  I develop the written content from the photos.  I try to include interesting, educational content as well as personal insights.  At times, I will decide to look for something specific, like macro shots. I may also talk about the process of taking the photo if I think it is helpful for my readers.

What advice do you have for beginning bloggers or photographers?

I recommend taking classes, reading, and talking to other bloggers and photographers.  You can avoid a lot of mistakes by learning what has worked for others.

Where can we learn more about your photography?

The best place you can learn about my photography is at the blog, horiconmarshnaturephotgraphy.com.

Anything else you’d like to share with our readers?

Don’t be afraid to jump in and start your own blog.  It is a great opportunity to learn and to meet others who share the same interests.

Thank you, Lisa!

For our other posts in the entrepreneur interview series:

Amazon best selling author Lawrence Colby, write of The Devil Dragon Pilot:  Part 1 and Part 2.  Colby has finished his draft of his second book, The Black Scorpion Pilot.  Stay tuned for another interview with him after the book is available on Amazon.

Amazing photographer Richard Weldon Davis.

Successful entrepreneur and owner of Custom Display Cases, Mo Johnson: Part 1Part 2Part 3, and Part 4.

Incredible baker and entrepreneur, Haleigh Heard.

Stay tuned for our next interview in the entrepreneur series!

 

Interview with Entrepreneur and Baker, Haleigh Heard, Owner of S’Cute Petite Bakery

This is our interview with our fourth entrepreneur in our interview series, Haleigh Heard, owner of S’Cute Petite bakery.

Haleigh Heard, Owner of S'Cute Petite
Haleigh Heard, Owner of S’Cute Petite

Tell us a little bit about your company.

I am a home bakery which specializes in cupcakes.

What else do you make?

(laughing) Cupcakes.

You make other things besides cupcakes.

I don’t.

You made a cake.

I made a cake for a birthday party.

You made a cake for us, too.

Yes, I did.  I don’t normally do cakes.

What is your biggest seller?

My biggest seller is my chocolate chip cupcake with butter cream or cream cheese frosting.

Is that the triple chocolate one or is that a different one?

It’s a new one.  I’ve improved on it.  It’s pretty good, you should try it sometime.

I should.  Valentines Day is coming up.  Can I place an order?

Sure.  If you buy twelve, you get one free.

I’ll buy twelve then.  Can you make twelve for us?  

Sure, no problem.

How did you get started in baking?

I think I found my passion for baking about 4 years ago.  Every Saturday afternoon I would go on Pinterest and I’d find something to bake.  I’d bake it and bring it to Sunday School.  I’d give it to the people in Sunday school class and say “try this.”

That was probably a ready audience.

I’d say “Did you like it?  Did you not like it?  What can improve?  Is it good?”

Instant feedback.

It was.

Tell us a little bit about your creative process.

My creative process is pretty much I go on Pinterest a lot.  I look at things.  That’s how I got my chocolate chip cupcake.  I forgot a couple ingredients in the recipe, and I decided to throw a handful of chocolate chips in it.  It was probably the best chocolate chip cupcake and everyone was talking about it.

What are some of your entrepreneur lessons learned so far?

I’d have to say, you can never ask too many questions.  I’ve asked my Dad a million questions like how should I sell my cupcakes?  How to price them?  My delivery system?  How I should deliver?  And then I think, just have fun with your business.  You started it for a reason.  It’s not a chore you have to do.  I think that’s what I thought in the beginning was I had to have the perfect cupcake when I deliver it. It has to be perfect, and when it’s not I had a meltdown. I threw the cupcake away and I started again.  That’s just the way my mindset was, that it had to be perfect.  Now I’m having fun with my business.  I’m getting more opportunities to promote myself.

Just have fun.

Or else, why do it?

Why do it?  You have fun, right?

Absolutely.  My time in the wood shop is a lot of fun.

Really, have you ever stabbed a finger?  Did you ever miss?

I stabbed myself with the jigsaw the other day.  It wasn’t too bad.  I rinsed it off, slapped a bandaid on it and kept going.

Shake it off, right?

What advice do you have for beginning entrepreneurs?

Have fun.  You started your business for a reason.  Don’t make it a chore.

Anything else you’d like to share with our readers?

I am planning on doing coupons and gift certificates, for things like Valentines Day, Mothers Day, and Fathers Day.

That will be a big seller, I think.  Try it.  If it doesn’t work, move on to something else.  Where can we learn more about your company?

You can can go on Facebook and type in “S’Cute Petite” (click here to go to Haleigh’s business Facebook page).  I’m trying to figure out more options.

Are you going to have a website besides Facebook or is Facebook going to be the primary?

Facebook is going to be the primary because you can go straight to Facebook Messenger and let me know what you’d like.

Thank you for your time, Haleigh.  We love the cupcakes.  Readers, go to Haleigh’s FB page and order some!

********

For our other posts in the entrepreneur interview series:

Amazon best selling author Lawrence Colby, write of The Devil Dragon Pilot:  Part 1 and Part 2

Amazing photographer Richard Weldon Davis.

Successful entrepreneur and owner of Custom Display Cases, Mo Johnson: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4.

Stay tuned for our next interview in the entrepreneur series!

 

3 Crucial Tips for Entrepreneurs to Survive the Robot Invasion

The Industries of the Future
The Industries of the Future

Are robots going to put you out of a job?  What should you do about it?  Alec Ross recently came out with a book titled “The Industries of the Future” where he writes about the coming disruption due to robots and artificial intelligence that got me wondering “what does this mean for entrepreneurs and woodworkers?”  Will robots replace us all?  Let’s take a look.  I’ll give you three entrepreneur strategies to survive the robot invasion based on some of the prognostications in Ross’ book.

#1 Make Your Own Job

Some folks may think the widespread adoption of robots is in some far-off future, but Ross says “Japan already leads the world in robotics, operating 310,000 of the 1.4 million industrial robots in existence across the world.”  As you can see, the robots are already here and there will only be more.  We’d all better think very carefully about the career we have or the career we want, because it may not exist in the future.  For example, about a year ago I went on a trip to Japan.  My buddy and I went to a restaurant to grab a bite and when we walked in there was a kiosk facing the door with large buttons with pictures of entrees on them.  We picked what looked good, plopped in our yen, and the machine spit out a ticket.  We sat down and a few minutes later, a human delivered our food.  There were only two staff in the entire restaurant:  the food-deliverer and the cook.  That restaurant model already exists in other countries and is on its way to the United States.  All those workers at McDonalds and Burger King may be soon be gone.

Ross talks about this move to automate:  “Boiled down to economic terms, the choice between employing humans versus buying and operating robots involves a trade-off in terms of expenditures.  Human labor involves very little ‘capex’ or capital expenditures–up-front payments for things like building, machinery, and equipment–but high ‘opex,’ or operational expenditures, the day-to-day costs such as salary and employee benefits.  Robots come with a diametrically opposed cost structure:  their up-front capital costs are hight, but their operating costs are minor–robots don’t get a salary.  As the capex of robots continues to go down, the opex of humans becomes comparatively more expensive and therefore less attractive for employers.”  Almost every business today is doing the cost/benefit analysis of whether to make those capital expenditures comparing the cost of humans versus robots.  As the cost of robots come down, more humans will be replaced.

It is clear that many of traditional jobs will be going away, which is all the more reason to start preparing for the robotpocalypse.  Ross writes “How much harder will it be to get a first job?  How about a second?”  One of the ways is to make your own job, as Mo Johnson did at Better Display Cases, Lawrence Colby did in writing his first book, or some of the other entrepreneurs did that we are about to profile in this blog.  Mo and Lawrence are each earning some good $$$ because they decided to make their own jobs, but that requires some solid planning and execution.

I recently ran across an article in Popular Woodworking that is another great example of creating your own job and is also a good model for people transitioning out of the military.  The story (click here for link) called “End Grain:  Marine Corps to Shop Floor,” talks about Grant Burger’s journey from Marine to full time craftsman.  Grant knew he was getting out of the military and created his own job, by using his education benefits to attend a furniture making school in Boston.  Now he is selling rocking chairs that cost more than $2000 each and are absolutely beautiful.  To see some of his work, check out Grant’s blog here.

This automated, robotic future is not something to fear, but is a fertile playground of opportunity for the entrepreneur, as we’ll see below.

#2 Go Microentrepreneur With The Codification of Money, Markets, and Trust

“But the codification of money, markets, payments, and trust is the next big inflection point in the history of financial services.  Understanding what it means for your and your business will be important regardless of whether you are a plumber or the CEO of a fortune 500 company.”  Entrepreneurs need to embrace these changes or run the risk of being left behind.  Ross goes on to profile Square, the company that created the attachment you can use with a tablet to swipe and process credit cards:  “From its inception, Square has been about enabling the kind of small-scale transactions…Its approach has been to try to eliminate the costs and complication of standard credit card transactions.”  This creates a tremendous opportunity for woodworkers, or any craftsman, for that matter.  Many of my fellow woodworkers sell their pieces at arts and crafts fairs.  With tools like Square, any entrepreneur can charge a sale anywhere at any time, such as at craft fairs.

“Square and its competitors are trying to reduce friction in the marketplace.   They are trying to dial down the complication and the tens of billions of dollars spent in the form off credit card fees, exchange fees, or the cost of lost transactions…”  As we wrote about in our post on Clausewitz, entrepreneurs are continually trying to overcome friction, and companies like Square will only help.  The CEO of Square “believes that Square is part of a larger trend refocusing the economy toward bottom-up innovation.  He explains, “one of the reasons we started this company, from a personal standpoint, is this trend toward more local experiences.  So I think the fabric of the neighborhood and how online is pointing to more offline local experiences is a very, very interesting trend.”  As we wrote about in our posts on Community and the post on Reflections artisans can thrive in this environment.

“Anyone can pick up a device they already own and suddenly become a powerful commerce engine in that particular area.”  This could also be useful for entrepreneurs involved in services such as Uber drivers or freelancers doing work on sites like TaskRabbit.  Ross goes on to say “But as with other mass infrastructure deployments, like railroads in the 19th century, the full potential of the network is borne out only when other entrepreneurs layer their creativity and commerce on top of it.”  He also says   “I think of the sharing economy as a way of making a market out of anything and a micro entrepreneur out of anybody.”

It is the golden age of entrepreneurship.  Let’s take a look at the third tip to survive the robot invasion.

#3 Go Local, Then Global

Robots will thrive where there are many automated, repetitive tasks.  Even as artificial intelligence gets smarter, there will be opportunities for entrepreneurs.  “With coded markets available to even the smallest vendors, a trend has arisen that pushes economic transactions away from physical stores or hotels and toward individual people, as they connect either locally or online.”  Today, any one of us can process credit card transactions using companies like Square, as mentioned above.  This is incredibly freeing and allows anyone, anywhere to process payments.  Along those lines, Ross writes:  “Though the world’s major cities are fueling the global economy, one does not need to be in an alpha city to succeed.  In fact, Internet technology allows people to be almost anywhere and operate a successful business.”  An entrepreneur couple I’ve mentioned previously (see Pure Living for Life) runs a blog, YouTube channel, Instagram presence, Twitter presence, etc. profiling their move to off the grid living.  They started on a bare piece of land in Idaho, but technology allowed them to create this multimedia presence to document their off grid journey.  Come to think of it, if they have Internet are they off grid???  They started local and are now global.

Another concrete example of this starting local then going global is one of my favorite woodworkers, Marc Spagnuolo, The Wood Whisperer.  Marc started locally building commissioned furniture, but then realized the amazing potential of the Internet.  He started teaching fellow woodworkers via his blog, then videos on his website.  He now has a global empire and operates globally via his blog, videos, DVDs, etc.  Woodcraft Magazine just ran a great profile of him.  Check out the article here.

This concept of starting local then going global has been a good model for Traughber Design.  We started custom woodworking locally and the blog is now read around the world, in 33 countries at last count..  It’s interesting to look at the metrics and see what far-flung countries are reading it.

We’ve covered a lot of ground today.  Follow these three keys and you’ll be well on your way to surviving the robot invasion:

#1 Make Your Own Job
#2 Go Microentrepreneur With The Codification of Money, Markets, and Trust
#3 Go Local, Then Global

 

 

Interview with Entrepreneur and Photographer Richard Weldon Davis

the jefferson memorial
The Jefferson Memorial

This interview is part of a series of interviews with fellow entrepreneurs.  Our first was with a best-selling author.  In this interview, photographer Richard Weldon Davis shares some of his methods and secrets to success.  Read on!

How did you get started in photography?
 
I was on vacation with my wife celebrating our 20th wedding anniversary about 6 years ago.  We hired a photographer to take pictures of our vow renewal ceremony.  I started asking the photographer about the camera as I had become intrigued with the idea of buying a DSLR (digital single-lens reflex) camera (think digital version of a 35mm camera).  I bought one when we got home and I started taking pictures using the automatic mode, allowing the camera to make all the decisions for me.  For the most part I was disappointed in the shots.  They just weren’t coming out the way I envisioned them.  This went on for a couple years and I didn’t use the camera much.
 
the washington monument at night
The Washington Monument

During a visit to some old friends, both of whom are excellent photographers, I asked for help.  They both worked with me to show me how to take pictures in manual mode and select the Shutter Speed, ISO (think film speed) and Aperture myself.  They patiently explained what selections to make for which shots I wanted.  They also showed me the basics of photo editing in Lightroom, a program from Adobe related to Photoshop.

With this new information in hand I began to experiment with the 3 sides of the exposure triangle (Shutter Speed, ISO and Aperture) to get different shots.  I’m still learning every day, but now I make the camera do what I want instead of allowing the camera to decide.  In order to understand the exposure triangle, think of the camera as a room (that’s actually what the word means in Latin!) and the lens is a window.  To illuminate the room, you open the window.  How long the window is open is the Shutter Speed, how big the window is is the Aperture and how much light you have is the ISO (sensitivity to light).  So for an action shot of kids on the soccer field, you want a very quick Shutter Speed to freeze the action.  For a night photo of stars, you want a long shutter speed to gather more of the starlight for your shot.
 
I was lucky enough to go on one of your shoots as your “assistant” and it was impressive to watch how much effort you put into getting just the right shot.  Tell us a little bit about your creative process.
the golden gate bridge
The Golden Gate Bridge

I really enjoy landscape photography.  You and I were in San Francisco for work and I really wanted a nice shot of the Golden Gate Bridge while we were there.  In general, the best times of day to shoot outdoors is the period of twilight early in the morning at dawn or late dusk when the sunlight takes on a blue hue.  That’s why I dragged you to Baker’s Beach an hour or so before sunset.  I was hoping for a nice blue effect right after sunset.  It turned out pretty nice and I appreciate you humoring me hanging on the beach dodging a random nudist.

night stars
Night Stars

I’m also a big fan of night photography.  I love the way different lights are captured by the camera; from the starburst effect of streetlights during a long exposure to the streaks of red and white lights from cars driving by to capturing the stars that outline the Milky Way galaxy, I really enjoy longer exposures (can’t get that shot in light polluted DC!).

No matter your shot, the key to photography is understanding and harnessing the light, whether it is sunlight, a flash, or starlight travelling for thousands of years to light your scene.
I’ve begun to dabble with portrait photography and that is fun as well.  Again it comes down to light.
 
What lessons learned do you have for other budding entrepreneurs?
 
I’m not much of an entrepreneur yet, but for those exploring photography with a DSLR camera, the equipment is secondary, you need to shoot in manual and learn how to make the exposure triangle work for you.  It helps to look at photographs online where the artist has listed Shutter Speed, ISO and Aperture so you can dissect their shot and figure out how they did it.  You can also find great resources online to better understand your camera and its functions.  Don’t be discouraged if your shots don’t look as good as those you find online, just keep shooting.  Figure out what kind of photography you like and how to differentiate yourself from other photographers.
 
Also, what’s a good link where we can buy your prints?
My best shots are available at Fine Art America:
I also have a sometimes updated blog at http://chartprepping.com/ where I write about early retirement and my hobbies to include photography.
sandals resort
Sandals Resort
 Thanks so much for the interview Jerry!

Entrepreneurship and Woodworking Require a Community

military challenge coin display black walnut
Military Challenge Coin Display in Black Walnut

I was messing around in the wood shop over the holidays and created the military challenge coin display shown in the picture with a piece of scrap black walnut.  During the process, I was thinking how many people are necessary to pursue a creative endeavor like this (woodworking) and what a terrific community we have.  Some people may have the mistaken impression that woodworking consists of toiling away solo in a wood shop, but nothing could be farther from the truth.  There is a large network of people who are generous in sharing their wisdom and help make that woodworker or entrepreneur successful.  One way to frame it is by considering three groups:  artisans, enablers, and clients.

Artisans

The Traughber Tribe recently went to Canaan Valley WV for our annual cross country ski vacation.  This year we went over Christmas and planned to open some of our gifts there.  As a gift, my daughter gave me an allowance to spend in the resort gift shop.  Since we enjoy candlelight dinners, I thought I’d buy a locally made candle.  But then I got to thinking…for the price I’d pay for the candle in the gift shop, I could get two or three times as much candle at a discount store back home.  I tossed the idea out to our daughter and she said “Dad, is that even a question?”  Her meaning was, how could I NOT buy the candle from the local artisan, which is what we did.

I receive so much inspiration from my fellow makers.  On a recent business trip, after hours a colleague and I went on a photo shoot since he’s big into photography.  We were in San Francisco and he knew a particular location where he wanted to take the perfect photo of the Golden Gate Bridge.  We spent hours taking photos in different locations, with different lighting, with different camera settings.  I know nothing about photography, but it was inspirational to see another craftsman spending so much time to create something beautiful.  We’ll have a post soon covering an interview with the photographer and you’ll see the results from the photo shoot.

Fellow artisans are also terrific mentors.  They don’t necessarily even need to be skilled in your particular craft.  For example, the author (Lawrence Colby author of The Devil Dragon Pilot) we interviewed recently and I chat often about blog ideas, writing and our craft.  In almost every conversation he gives me some pearl of wisdom that helps me in Traughber Design.  Fellow craftsmen are great for helping keep things in alignment with the business’ vision and goals as we wrote about in our post on glue technique.

Lastly, craftsmen provide fellowship.  Recently we spent Christmas with my pal Steve’s family; Steve is also a Festool fanatic (see our post about Festool here).  He gets it.  He fully understands why someone would spend an exorbitant amount on a power tool and think of it as value.  Hanging out with like-minded people is part of the great fun of being an entrepreneur and craftsman.

Enablers

Woodworkers could not do what they do without hardwood dealers, specialty suppliers, and tool experts.  I was up at Colonial Hardwoods recently to buy some wood for our windowsill commission, and the dealer pointed out some wonderful white oak they had recently received.  We took a look and I ended up buying some and using it in a recent commission.  Where else would a salesperson consider what you are making and make suggestions beyond what you said you came to buy? And where else would they let you wander around the warehouse and pick the pieces you like?  Our community is so giving.

Gun Cabinet in Black Walnut

Another key enabler is the specialty supplier.  In my case, one of these consists of glass suppliers.  Del Ray Glass was a company I used for the black walnut gun cabinet (pictured).  I don’t know much about glass (in addition to photography), but they walked me through thicknesses, types of glass, frostings available, etc. and delivered on time and at a fair price.  They are on my short list the next time I need some glass.

Last there are the tool guys.  It would have been very difficult to learn Festool so quickly without Brian Graham’s tutelage at the Festool Ubershop on Baltimore.  He set up the equipment before I arrived, gave a demo, I played around with it, then we boxed it up to take home.  It’s so much easier to learn a tool hands-on like that.

Clients

military challenge coin display in black walnut
Military Challenge Coin Display in Black Walnut – Angle View

One of the great things I love about our clients is they reveal the art of the possible.  When a client asks “can you build that?” I almost always say yes.  I’ve usually got a general idea to begin with, but sometimes get to experiment in the shop with alternate ways of making something.  For example, with the military challenge coin holder I could have cut the slots from the bottom with the router table.  I also could have cut them from the top using a rail guide and the router.  I could have also used a jig.  That’s part of the fun in creating is experimenting and mulling over what works best.

Our client network continues to grow.  A client may have a piece in their home, then other people see it and word gets around.  Most of our business so far has been from referrals.  For example, a kitchen cabinet panel commission came about from a Facebook conversation (see our post: How to Make a Kitchen Cabinet Door:  Flat Panel Construction).  I love the serendipity of where our projects come from.

Speaking of clients, I’m currently reading a book for my day job called The Industries of the Future by Alec Ross.  Ross is analyzing which industries will be replaced by robots.  One of the beauties of the artisanal movement is our works are not likely to be outsourced.  Sure, you can buy mass-produced furniture from overseas, but that’s not the market we’re in.  We do custom woodworking which doesn’t lend itself to outsourcing.  Our local clients are buying from us, not some company overseas.

We’re very fortunate to have such a great woodworking and entrepreneurial community and look forward to spending time with that community in the new year.

Get Out of the Rat Race: How to Manage the Transition from Career to Maker

small business lessons learned
Building the Small Business

Tired of the rat race?  Ready to get off that hamster wheel?  Being a maker (like a woodworker, for instance) can be incredibly rewarding.  It’s not easy to get there, but the rewards are incredible freedom and limitless creativity.

 

There are many paths to success, but I’ll share what has worked for Traughber Design.  We’re currently in a position of having as much business as we can handle as a part-time (see blog post #1) enterprise.  We’ve delivered two commissions in the past couple weeks, are currently working on a dining room chair commission, and are about to ink three deals on more projects.  This was after 2 years of effort, though, and we’ve learned some things along the way.

If you’re contemplating such a journey or have already retired, the following principles may help.

You have some amount of time every day you can devote to making.  Everyone’s situation is different, but you can get up early, stay up late, or shoe horn in a few minutes before or after dinner.  That amount of time depends on how badly you want to succeed with the transition.  I experimented with multiple approaches over 2 years and found that allocating a set amount of time every day worked best for me.  I’m currently setting aside 90 minutes every day split in two pieces (more on that below) since I’m about 2 years away from retirement and want to ensure this endeavor supports my family before then.

Along those lines, another key ingredient for success is to just get in the shop.  Some days I get tired and don’t feel like it, but I drag my sorry butt down to the wood shop.   Once I get started I’m energized again and more often than not, find myself in the zone (or flow).

Another strategy is to get up a little earlier every day.  As we learned in our interview with an Amazon Best Selling author and entrepeneur in a future post, getting up early every day before someone’s day job is a way to squeeze in some regular making time.

Split time between making and managing.  I owe a great debt of gratitude to Paul Graham, the founder of Y Combinator, which many view as the pre-eminent start-up incubator in the world.  Graham wrote a great blog post in 2009 called Maker’s Schedule, Manager’s Schedule about the difference between making and managing.  Making to me means unfettered time in the wood shop to create or time to write blog posts.  Managing is all the associated functions like drafting proposals for clients, filing taxes, etc. and includes everything not making. I allocate 60 minutes minimum for making and 30 minutes for managing every day (remember I’m doing this part-time for now).  Sometimes life happens (Back to School Night for one of our kids, for example) and I don’t get to spend any time in the shop, but that is the exception rather than the rule.  If I can’t get the full hour in the shop, I try to spend whatever time will allow.

An hour per day for a year is extremely powerful!  I take Sundays off, and 1 hour per day, 6 days per week over the course of a year comes out to 312 hours.  That is a ton of woodworking projects.  The gun cabinet project took 100 hours, but most projects are in the 10 to 20 hour range.  That means you can potentially crank out around a dozen projects in a year with only 1 hour in the shop per day.  If you leverage holidays and weekends while you are still in a career, you can accelerate your making that much more.

Another very important concept to consider is efficiency.  Between the times I’m in the shop, I’m thinking about how I’m going to use that hour the most effectively.  In addition, I write down exactly what I’m going to do with the 30 minutes of managing time. As I’ve told our kids a million times, “plan the attack and attack the plan.” It’s amazing how you can quickly move through your tasks during managing time when you’ve written them down.  For example, my goal was to spend 30 minutes per night going through a WordPress class this summer, but I found if I focused, it didn’t take 30 minutes every night.  If I had extra time, then I moved on to drafting blog posts, like this one.  I could not have been that efficient if I hadn’t written down what I wanted to achieve in those 30 minutes.

Start your side business now while you have income from your primary career.  Building a business takes a very long time.  I’ve been at this for almost 2 years now and am just now at the point where the commissions are rolling in on a regular basis.  I’m confident this will work.  You want to build enough revenue that you can be confident your small business will be a going concern before you jump ship from your primary career.  In addition, you can build all the start-up infrastructure (company registration, insurance, website, tools, etc.) you need so that when you do transition you can focus on making and continue to build your client base.

Already made the transition?  Share your lessons learned below!