Green Bay Packers Philosophy for the Entrepreneur: Be Like Aaron Rodgers

Green Bay Packers Logo
Green Bay Packers Logo

The Green Bay Packers and Aaron Rodgers have had an unbelievable run of 9 straight years going to the National Football League (NFL) playoffs.  This is a testament to the leadership of the organization and the team’s principles, which are applicable in life and entrepreneur philosophy in general.  This season didn’t end the way Packer Nation had hoped this year, but getting to the NFC Championship game was quite an accomplishment, especially considering all the injuries the team had this year (they experienced a lot of friction as we wrote about earlier in our post on Clausewitz). Here are some lessons we can learn from The Pack.

Take a Chance Occasionally on a Big Play 

There is a play in football called the Hail Mary, where in a desperate bid to score points with limited time, the quarterback heaves the ball downfield into the end zone hoping one of his receivers will catch it.  Most quarterbacks will never successfully complete a Hail Mary at the professional level.  Aaron Rodgers and the Green Pay Packers have completed THREE, the last during a playoff game against the New York Giants.  Many teams in that situation would just kill the clock with only a few seconds remaining, but somehow the Packers seem to convert those slivers of time into points more than other teams.  In addition, Aaron Rodgers will create more of these Hail Mary opportunities by causing other teams to jump offsides with an offbeat cadence, which generates a “free play.”  Since flags are thrown for the offside, he has the opportunity to continue with the play or accept the penalty.  He always tries to throw a bomb downfield for the chance to make a big play during these offsides calls.  How can this Hail Mary and offsides philosophy help us in life and as entrepreneurs?

First of all, what long bombs can you throw in your entrepreneurial ventures?  Think about what one thing would make your idea just explode.  What is it?  As entrepreneurs, we have to be smart with small bets that cause big payoffs.  We have to ensure those small bets won’t bankrupt the company or damage our cash flow too much, just like Aaron Rodgers with those “free plays.”  He has nothing to lose and everything to gain.  More importantly, the Packers practice those plays continually so that when it’s game time, they are ready.  Rodgers practices that offbeat cadence to draw defenses offsides and the entire offense practices the Hail Mary play just in case they need to try it in a game.  As an entrepreneur, the philosophy of trying the big play occasionally should be in our DNA.  We should continually be asking that question of what is high payoff, low investment and throw that long bomb.

Maybe you’re at the point of thinking about starting a business.  What is that first step?  Take it.

Don’t Listen to The Haters

Mike McCarthy is the coach of the Packers, and has been for some time.  This fall, the press was insinuating his head may have been on the chopping block this season after the Packers had four losses in a row.  Had McCarthy suddenly become stupid after all those seasons of success?  He berated the media during a press conference and told them he was a successful NFL coach and gave them some of his perspective.  Personally, I didn’t think the Packers would make the playoffs at that point.  They looked terrible during the losing streak.  But Mike McCarthy and Aaron Rodgers didn’t listen to the doubters.  Aaron Rodgers said they would need to run the table to make the playoffs (meaning win the rest of their games), which they did by winning eight games in a row, including playoffs.  Not to mention, they knocked off the #1 team in their conference (the Dallas Cowboys) in the playoffs on the road.

Along those lines, entrepreneurs can’t afford to expend any energy on haters or doubters.  There isn’t enough time.  The Minimalists talk about this some on their podcasts.  They talk about how you can’t change your friends, but that you can change your friends.  Their meaning is that you can’t change some people, but you can change who you spend time with.  Why hang out with people that don’t support your vision or aren’t encouraging?  Who else talks about dealing with doubters?  Taylor Swift.

My daughter is a big Taylor Swift fan.  We went to Taylor’s 1989 Tour concert here at Nationals Stadium a while back.  I was probably the oldest Swiftee (Swiftie?) in the stadium that night by far, but we had a great time.  Taylor sang a song called “Shake it Off” where she sang about how the haters are going to hate and that we should just shake it off.  That’s wise counsel from Ms. Swift.  Entrepreneurs:  shake it off.

Everyone on the Team is Valuable

No matter what their job, everyone in the organization is valuable.  Earlier in my career, I worked for a two-star general who gave me some sage advice.  He talked about how the 2-striper (a junior Airman) fixing the water pipes on an Air Force base at two o’clock in the morning was probably the most important person on the base at that moment.  His point was that every last person on our Air Force team was valuable.  The Green Bay Packers follow the same philosophy.  They have been injury-plagued this season and lost their #1 running back (Eddie Lacey), #1 cornerback (Sam Shields), and #1 receiver (Jordy Nelson).  Their philosophy is that the younger guys need to step up and that every last player has to do their part, even if they are not a starter.

The Packers also consider the community to be part of the team.  When there is a large snowstorm in Green Bay, the team asks the local community to turn out and help shovel snow at Lambeau Field, and the locals love to do it.  The consider it to be their team.  Along those lines, the Green Bay Packers have a unique ownership structure.  They are the only NFL team with shareholders and are publicly owned.  I bought a share of the team some time ago and consider the Packers to be my team since I’m a shareholder.  The team makes us feel part of the community by making share ownership seem like a big deal, even if the shares can’t be traded like a real stock.

Well, I hope that’s given you something to ponder:  go for the big play, don’t listen to the haters, and embrace everyone on the team.  I wish you the best of luck on your entrepreneurial journey.  It’s a great ride.

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