3 Reasons Entrepreneurs Should be on a Minimalism Journey

Marie Kondo, Author of The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up
Marie Kondo, Author of The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up

In 2 days, we start our Second Annual Minimalism Challenge!  What does minimalism have to do with entrepreneurship and woodworking?  Everything!  Minimalism is a movement to pare back on tasks and things in order to focus on what’s important in your life.  If those things that are important to you include entrepreneurship and/or woodworking, then minimalism is a tool to help focus on both of those passions.  We wrote earlier about our minimalism journey in What Do You Mean I Have to Move the Wood Shop???!!!??? Entrepreneurs Need to Be Flexible and will talk about a specific tactic (the Minimalism Challenge) to propel you on your minimalism journey.

So what is The Minimalism Challenge?  Very simply, you get rid of a number of things equal to that day of the month.  For example, on August 1st we will get rid of one thing.  On the 31st, we’ll each get rid of at least 31 things.  By the end of the month, we’ll each have gotten rid of around 500 things.  Our friends Josh and Ryan, The Minimalists, have written out the rules of engagement in their post Let’s Play a Minimalism Game.

So how does one identify the things to get rid of?  One method that was useful for us was to follow Marie Kondo’s example.  Marie wrote a New York Times bestseller called The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up which has a multi-step process (she calls it the KonMari Method) for decluttering your house.  If you don’t have a starting point, Marie’s framework might be useful to you.  For example, one of the first steps is to focus on reducing your wardrobe.  First, you put all of your clothes together then decide what to keep and what to get rid of.  Anything that hasn’t been worn in the last 90 days is a prime candidate to jettison.  Mrs Woodworker and I did that last year and it was amazing how many clothes we each had when we brought every single piece of clothing we owned into one room.  It was a real eye opener.  As you need items to shed for the Minimalism Challenge, you can leverage Marie’s method to find more items.

There is at least one caveat, however.  Some folks are not great fans of Kondo’s method, so use it with your eyes open.  For more, read 5 Reasons I Hate Marie Kondo (Admit It, Deep Down You Do Too).

But why pursue The Challenge in the first place?

#1:  It frees up time for your passion

Stuff has to be tended to.  The larger the house, the more maintenance required.  The more cars, the more trips to the auto shop.  In our post Woodworking and Minimalism: If I Buy All These Tools Am I a Minimalist? we described the rationale behind it, but I’d to explore more about the aspect of freeing up time, one of our most precious assets.  Maria Popova, the writer of Brain Pickings who has millions of blog readers, gave a great overview of the value of time when she unpacked Seneca’s (Seneca is one of the great Stoic philosophers) letters regarding time (I subscribe to her weekly newsletter).  Here is a taste from Seneca:

“It is not that we have a short time to live, but that we waste a lot of it. Life is long enough, and a sufficiently generous amount has been given to us for the highest achievements if it were all well invested. But when it is wasted in heedless luxury and spent on no good activity, we are forced at last by death’s final constraint to realize that it has passed away before we knew it was passing. So it is: we are not given a short life but we make it short, and we are not ill-supplied but wasteful of it… Life is long if you know how to use it.”

If you’d like specific ideas about stealing back more time, read our post Lifestyle Design: Tactics, Techniques and Procedures for Entrepreneurs, and Everyone Else.

For more insight into freeing up time, Ii you haven’t had the chance yet, you have to check out a documentary series on Netflix called Abstract (see YouTube trailer here) on multiple ground breaking makers/artists/designers.  If you watch very carefully, it’s fascinating to watch how they live their lives and put everything they have into their craft.  For example, one of the designers is Tinker Hatfield who designed the Air Jordan shoe for Nike.  These designers are all minimalists, so some degree.

One thing to be aware of, is that as you focus on your craft, you will start to see results.  As your enterprise becomes more successful, the demands on your time will increase.  See our post 4 Ways for Entrepreneurs to Manage Their Backlog: When the Cup Overflows for some suggestions in dealing with this.

#2:  It frees up money for your passions

Whether you realize it or not, your house or apartment is full of buried treasure.  Anything you haven’t used in about the past 90 days is fair game to be converted into $$$.  We follow the following protocol (in this order) for getting rid of stuff and generating dollars:

Sell on ebay.  This is the most profitable way to pare down your possessions.  One of the greatest advantages is that you can see what the real value of things are.

Sell on Craigslist.  Craigslist is a bit of  yard sale in terms of prices, but if you are patient, people will come to your house and actually pay you to take your things away.  It’s like having your own ATM, but you don’t have to go to the ATM.  It brings money to your house.

Sell at a yard sale.  This can be a real time suck, but if the weather is good it’s a nice way to spend a Saturday morning and you usually get to meet a lot of really interesting people and neighbors.

Sell from your yard.  This is a new technique for us.  If there is a garage sale down the street from us and the garage sale traffic will be passing in front of our house, sometimes we’ll put an item with a price tag on it in the front yard.  Everything we have placed in the yard this way has sold.  We were able to sell our oak dining room set very quickly this way.

Donation tax break.  If you can’t sell something, take it to the nearest donation center.  We’ve been using the Vietnam Vets donation site in Woodbridge for years, because you drive up, they come out and take your things away.  It’s very fast and convenient.  You can also get a break on your taxes IF you are itemizing deductions.

Give it away (don’t have to pay to move it again).  I don’t believe in Karma, BUT you’ll get a good feeling from giving something away.  Freecycle is a very easy way to do this and they also have an app which makes it easy.  Visit www.freecycle.org to learn more.

#3:  It frees up your mind

Before I took command of my first squadron, we had to attend a pre-command class.  One of the lessons that really stuck with me was given by a three-star general.  He said “only do what only you can do”.  That was very profound and I had to mull it over for awhile.  He told us to take a look at our to-do list.  I had over 30 items on my to-do list that day that I planned to tackle when I got to the squadron.  He told us to consider how many of those items could be delegated.  In my case, it was just about all but a half dozen.  There were a half dozen tasks that only I could do as the commander.  The others could be delegated.  He also make the point that by delegating we were creating teaching opportunities to develop our subordinates in the squadron.  His comments were a revelation.  Now I could really focus on the few things that were necessary to lead the squadron.  It freed up my mind.

Along those lines, the French philosopher Montaigne said “My life has been full of many misfortunes, most of which have never happened.” We spend so much of our mental bandwidth thinking about low probability things and can free up a lot of that bandwidth by thinking about more constructive and positive things.

Try the minimalism game for yourself and see if it frees up your time, frees up money, and frees up your mind.  If not, you at least had some fun in the process.  Follow me on my personal twitter feed @jttraughber for daily tweets on what we are jettisoning and our progress.  The hashtag will be #minimalismgame

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *