Tribute to Dad, the Ultimate Craftsman: 3 Entrepreneur Lessons Learned

Dad, the Ultimate Craftsman
Dad, the Ultimate Craftsman

As many of you know, my father recently passed away.  Many of the principles that have driven the success of Traughber Design were learned from “The Old Man” and are applicable to any entrepreneurial venture.  These lessons learned may help you on your entrepreneurial journey as well.

Eat the Elephant One Bite at a Time

When I was a teenager, Dad said he wanted to insulate the house.  You see, we lived on the Frozen Tundra (Wisconsin) where it was routinely 100 degrees below zero in the winter and a little insulation would go a long way.  I figured he was talking about unrolling some bales of insulation in the attic.  Oh no.  He wanted to remove every board of siding (we had vertical cedar siding), nail on 4′ x 8′ sheets of insulation and replace all the siding.  That was the easy part.  He also wanted to dig a 3′ wide trench at least 6′ deep all the way around the house so we could also insulate the cinder block foundation.  That’s where yours truly came in.  This was during the summer, so every day I would go out and dig until my arms fell off.  Then the next day, I would do the same thing.  Eventually, we were able to cover the entire house in well-insulated foam boards to protect us from the elements.  When Dad first proposed the project, I thought he was nuts.  But one bite at a time, we ate that elephant and the house became extremely energy efficient.

That lesson is a great one for entrepreneurs.  We recently delivered our largest commission to date for Traughber Design.  3 years ago, there wasn’t even a company.  There was just an idea in a founder’s head.  But one day at a time we worked on crafting commissions in the wood shop and built our customer base.  Now we have more business than we can handle as a part time enterprise. Not to mention, the blog readership continues to build, one post at a time.  You too can build your entrepreneurial vision the same way.

If you focus on consistently doing the work every day, you’ll be amazed at what can be accomplished in a year.  Eat that elephant, one bite at a time.

Where There’s a Will, There’s a Way

What is holding you back from achieving your entrepreneur dreams?  Is it money?  Time?  Something else?  There is a way, you just need to find it as Dad did with our first house.  Dad was a middle school science teacher and didn’t make a lot of money.  He augmented his income with painting houses in the summers and coaching, but he wanted a house for his young family and couldn’t afford it.  No problem.  In that situation, you just build it yourself.  He drew up some designs, hired a general contractor to make sure everything was up to code, and every day after school went up to “The Hill” and worked on the house.  Dad used what he did have, those few hours every day after school to convert into a house for his young family.  It may be that you are not using what you do have to achieve your vision.

Another example of Dad finding a way was in ice fishing.  When I was a kid, Dad would take me out on the ice during the winter to ice fish.  Initially this consisted of drilling holes with a manual ice augur, then sitting on an upturned bucket and freezing my butt off as we waited for the fish to bite.  We eventually bought a gas powered augur and Dad built a shanty on skis which kept us warm.  One of the vexing problems, though, was finding a better way to check our tip-ups when fishing at night.  Tip-ups are small wooden contraptions about a foot long that have fishing line that run down through the hole we drilled in the ice and had a lure at the bottom.  When a fish bit and tugged on the line, it released a flourescent flag to let us know to come get the fish.  Back in the day, there was no way to tell if you had a fish at night other than continually patrolling your tip-up sites or using a flashlight to see if your flags were up.  Dad the entrepreneur came up with a better idea, though.  What if there was a way for the tip-up to signal you when there was a fish on the line at night? He tinkered for hours on a device that would light up when a fish was on the line.  The tip-up flag would pull a line connected to a small plastic insulator separating two contacts on a battery powered lamp.  When the insulator was pulled out, the metal contacts would connect and the light would go on.  Dad made a small wooden device with a drilled out center to hold the battery, lamp on top, and electrical connectors on the side.  This device attached to the tip-up.  He willed his way to a system that allowed us to ring our shanty with about a dozen tip-ups that would signal us with lights when fish were on the line.  These kinds of devices are commonplace now, but Dad had to invent it from scratch back then.  He even researched patenting his contraption, but couldn’t afford the fees to do the patent and market the product on his meager teacher’s salary.  Nevertheless, we enjoyed using his invention for many years.

For more on willing yourself to success, read our Ode to Ralph the Woodworking Cat.

Maybe you Need to Reframe the Problem

Dad taught middle school science and had the challenge of trying to explain quantum physics for the first time to a bunch of 8th graders.  He started teaching us about electron clouds and valences and our minds started to explode.  I just couldn’t get my mind around the concept of a “cloud” of electrons until much later.  He knew from experience that kids our age were going to struggle with this concept and reframed the problem.  He gave us other frameworks to try such as electrons falling into “buckets” at various levels in the atom.  That idea I could latch on to until the cloud thing made sense.

Another person who is successfully reframing visions today is Elon Musk who is pushing forward in three primary areas:  space launch (SpaceX), solar panels (SolarCity), and electric cars (Tesla).  Musk has been very successful in dramatically reducing the cost of launches to space by building his own rockets and making them reusable.  No one even thought that was possible to reuse a rocket; however, he’s done it multiple times now.  My point, though, is that he didn’t build SpaceX to reduce the cost of getting to space.  He says it is to colonize Mars to ensure man’s survival by being on multiple planets.  He’s framed the problem as the survival of mankind.  Getting a job at SpaceX is extremely difficult because he has rallied young technical talent to his cause.  Would they be more enthused about saving money on launch costs or saving humankind?  If you are running into a dilemma in your entrepreneurial venture, maybe you need to reframe the problem as Elon Musk has.

Here is another example of reframing.  I’m currently reading a book called “Bold, How to Go Big, Create Wealth, and Impact the World” by Peter Diamandis and Steven Kotler which provides some examples of successful and unsuccessful reframing.  Diamandis founded the Ansari X Prize and 17 companies while Kotler is a best selling writer.  One of the successful examples they explain in their book is how Kodak reframed itself from a company that “was somewhere between a chemical supply house and a dry goods purveyor” to a company that wanted to make photography an every day affair.  The company grew to 140,000 employees with $28 annual revenue in 1996.  Kodak also highlights an example of unsuccessful reframing.  They were the inventor of the digital camera, but shelved it because they didn’t think it fit within their view of their business.  As most of you know, Kodak went bankrupt as a result.

I hope you enjoyed those three lessons from Dad:  Eat the Elephant One Bite at a Time,  Where There’s a Will, There’s a Way,  Maybe you Need to Reframe the Problem

 

 

 

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