How to Start a Business: Sometimes You Just Have to Say No

Black Walnut Jewelry Display
Black Walnut Jewelry Display

We turned down two commissions this week.  Is that how to start a business?  Am I crazy???  Maybe so.  My pal Derek Sivers who wrote Anything You Want says that when you are starting a business you should say “yes” to everything, because you can’t afford to be choosey.  On the flip side, he says that entrepreneurs are creating their own universe with its own set of principles, and why would they do work that doesn’t align with those principles?  Don’t get me wrong.  One of those commissions was a large refinishing project which I very much wanted to do, but I’ve already told about a half dozen people I would do their kitchen table, bookcase, entertainment center, etc. and there isn’t much time left in the year.  The other project was for six dining room chairs, but those chairs would have required upholstery which is not really my thing, and would require a lot of hand carving which is not currently my thing.  I guess the good thing is knowing here in year #4 of Traughber Design what “my thing” is. I guess it’s time to start saying no.

Another one of those principles was to migrate to a business that didn’t require a lot of commuting.  I’d like most of the work to be in the shop rather than on site, because after 11 years of commuting in DC during two Air Force tours, I’d rather not sit on I95 any longer.  Clients can come to the shop and pick up their pieces, which preserves my new 5 second commute to the garage.  Yes, I still have that lovely I95 commute because this is a side gig for now (I wrote about this some in the post Reflections on 2017…Merry Christmas and Happy New Year from Traughber Design!), BUT my retirement papers were approved (hurray!) and we (I use “we” because military service is a TEAM sport as Mrs Woodworker will attest) are within 1 year of official retirement and 8 months of terminal leave.

We’re not aiming to be a Rockefeller with Traughber Design (see our post Lessons Learned from John D. Rockefeller on Life, Entrepreneurship, and Woodworking) but make just enough to get by on military retirement (by the way, if you are making that transition also, I highly recommend Doug Nordman’s site The Military Guide on military transition and financial independence.  He also has some great content on how to start a business). Given our current backlog of projects, making a go of it shouldn’t be an issue.

On to more positive things, like saying “yes”!  We just completed a four sided jewelry display (see picture) for Nomades Collection in black walnut this week and are pretty happy with the result.  You may have seen two of our recent Facebook posts on this.  This was an evolution from the two sided version we profiled in the post Traughber Design and Nomades Collection Team Up!  Some of the new features are:

100% more display space.  The original display had two vertical jewelry trays back-to-back within a wooden frame.  While the two-tray model is perfect for a smaller store, this one has space for three trays and a fourth side with posts to hang bracelets and bangles (I don’t know what bangles are, but they seem to be popular with the ladies).  This allows for twice as much jewelry to be displayed.

A slot for brochures.  This was trickier than it looks.  The lazy susan bearings have to be reached from underneath to screw them in, so we had to make a removable bottom to be able to access the holes.  It killed me to use metal fasteners for that removable bottom since we always strive for 100% wooden joinery, but I couldn’t see a way around it.  At least the fasteners are not visible.  I’m still noodling around on ways to access the lazy susan without the removable bottom and metal fasteners.  If you have any ideas, leave them in the comments below.

Well, we sold out of the corn hole games, so I need to go tell the elves in the wood shop to get busy!  Now, that’s how to start a business…

What You Need to Know From the World’s Greatest Samurai On Entrepreneurship and Woodworking

The Book of Five Rings
The Book of Five Rings

Santa was very good to us this year.  He brought several terrific books on woodworking that were highly recommended by some of the current big names in woodworking.  One of these tomes, “The Book of Five Rings”, is a popular strategy book written in 1645 (available at Amazon.  Click here for the book), which you wouldn’t normally think of as an entrepreneurship and woodworking book; however, the author and samurai, Miyamoto Musashi, talks about working with wood in his strategy analogies which can be very helpful for entrepreneurs and woodworkers.

So who was Musashi?  He was the founder of the Niten-Ichi-Ryû-School of sword fighting and fought sixty duels, the first when he was 13.  Obviously, someone who fought that many duels with swords and survived, to such an age, is someone that might be worth listening to.  They just might have some skill and wisdom.

“The five ‘books” refer to the idea that there are different elements of battle, just as there are different physical elements in life.”  I’ll share three relevant concepts to the entrepreneur and woodworker here.

Become Proficient With Your Weapons (or Tools)

Musashi’s thoughts on artisanship and strategy are particularly useful:

“The Way of the carpenter is to become proficient in the use of his tools, first to lay his plans with a true measure and then perform his work according to plan.  Those he passes through life.”  Musashi then goes on to talk about the importance of training with weapons every day in order to become proficient.  Likewise, the craftsman must build up many hours of hands-on experience to become proficient.  Along those lines, I’m finding my current set of measuring tools are not up to the task as I continue to become more accurate.  For example, using the English system with 1/16 inch increments is just proving to be inefficient when I have to continually add or subtract 1/4, 1/8, 1/16 inch etc.  It’s much easier to do everything in the metric system which increases accuracy because there is less chance of making an adding or subtracting error.  In addition, a millimeter is finer than 1/16 inch which increases precision even more.  That’s why I’ve been gradually acquiring metric rulers and squares and using them more often.

“Like a trooper, the carpenter sharpens his own tools.  he carries his equipment in his tool box, and works under the direction fo his foreman.  he makes columns and girders with an axe, shapes floorboards and shelves with a glance, cuts fine openwork and carvings accurately, giving as excellent a finish as his skill will allow.  This is the craft of the carpenter.”  Musashi brings up a great point here.  It is so tempting to keep working away on a piece when you know you should stop and sharpen the tool, but who wants to stop when you’re making progress and having fun?  In the long run, it will take less time to take a break and sharpen that tool.

Develop Correct Strategy

“The comparison with carpentry is through the connection with houses.  Houses of the nobility, houses of warriors, the Four houses, ruin of houses, thriving of houses, the style of the house, the tradition of the house, and the name of the house.  The carpenter uses a master plan of the building, and the Way of strategy is similar in that there is a plan of campaign.  If you want to learn the craft of war, ponder over this book.  The teacher is as a needle, the disciple is as a thread.  You must practice constantly.”  Probably the most important step in designing a project is to listen to your client (we talked about that in our last post, Traughber Design and Nomades Collection Team Up!) and question them to understand what their vision is.  The next most important is to think through your strategy before shaping a single piece of wood.  This will save much time in the long run.  We see this continuously in woodworking.  It is imperative to have a strategy and plan for piece.  For example, without a cut list the woodworker will continually be shuttling back and forth from teh wood shop to the wood dealer.  I solid plan and cut list will ensure one trip for material and more time spent on the craft.

Another tie to strategy is that the enemy’s actions require the good strategist to adjust.  Likewise, the woodworker needs to adjust their strategy as the work progresses.  I recently finished a serving tray for Mrs. Woodworker.  We got a fine piece of mulberry from fellow woodworker, Jacob Hummitzch (thanks Jacob), and when Mrs Woodworker had seen the raw board (see the post , the original dimensions we had discussed were out the window because the mulberry has so many interesting patterns in it.  What I thought was going to be a simple rectangular board finished with a food-safe oil, is now going to be much different.  Mrs Woodworker wanted to keep at least one live edge, so then I had to think of a different finish to preserve the live edge.  In addition, we followed the  circles of the grain at one end, versus making 90 degree corners.  The woodworking strategy needs to be adjust to the wood, just as a military campaign strategy needs to be adjusted to conditions on the battlefield as Musashi writes.  For more on this read our post about Entrepreneurship, Woodworking, and Clausewitzian fog and friction.

Conquer Oneself

Musashi’s thesis is that “a man who conquers himself is ready to take on the world, should need arise”.  This is very useful advice for entrepreneurs.  If someone wants to scale up their enterprise, they need to get their personal leadership skills in order to be a good boss.  Leadership in an entrepreneurial enterprise is the same as leadership in the military, according to Musashi:  “The foreman carpenter must know the architectural theory of towers and temples, and the plans of palaces, and must employ men to raise up houses. The Way of the foreman carpenter is the same as the Way of the commander of a warrior house.”

“The foreman carpenter allots his men work according to their ability.  Floor layers, makers of sliding doors, thresholds and lintels, ceilings and so on.  Those of poor ability lay the floor joists, and those of lesser ability cave wedges and do such miscellaneous work.  If the foreman knows and deploys his men will the finished work will be good.”  In many cases, the supervisor can do the work, but should he/her?  In doing the work themselves, the supervisor is taking away an opportunity for subordinates to develop.

“The foreman should take into account the abilities and limitations of his men, circulating among them and asking nothing unreasonable.  He should know their morale and spirit, and encourage them when necessary.  This is the same as the principle of strategy”

I hope you enjoyed this deep dive into a Samurai’s view of woodworking and entrepreneurship.  Check out the book, when you get a chance.

Traughber Design and Nomades Collection Team Up!

two tray display for Nomades Collection
Two Tray Display for Nomades Collection

We are very excited about a collaboration we just started with a jewelry company called Nomades Collection to build displays for their retail locations.  The five founders have a fascinating origin story and I recommend checking out their website here.  During our discussions during the build, a few design principles reinforced themselves and I thought I’d share them with you.  First, I’ll talk about the design then about the design process.

 

The Design

A contrast in colors

The sky was the limit when it came to wood color, but the more we talked about it, the more a darker color made sense because the jewelry on the display is silver in color.  The black walnut gives a nice contrast to the silver.  And as you know, that’s probably my favorite wood at the moment as you saw in the black walnut gun cabinets we’ve made (read out post:  Our First Commission of 2017! Black Walnut Gun Cabinet).

Minimal ornamentation

We went with some gentle round overs (quarter inch) on the vertical frame and spinning base with a little more ornamentation on the fixed base at the bottom.  On the fixed base we went with a 3/8 inch round over and 1/16 inch shoulder since the base is farther away from the jewelry and wouldn’t detract from it.  The routing adds a little pizzaz, but doesn’t draw the eye too much.

Low center of gravity

These displays will be sitting on countertops and need to be rock solid as the displays are spun.  Given that, we went from thinner at the top to thicker at the bottom to keep all the weight low to stabilize the display.  For example, the vertical frames are only 1/2 inch, then we thickened to 3/4 inch on the spinning base, then a full inch thick at the bottom.

 

The Design Process

Listen

This is probably the most important step.  In this case, the client was way ahead of the game and had a digital drawing of what they were looking for.  That was a great starting point, and this is where you can add value:  by explaining which features are driving the cost so they can make informed decisions about which way to go.  Some things look great on paper, but can’t be manufactured easily, if it all; however, there are almost always alternatives.

Some other questions you need to ask are:

What is your product all about?  Is it a premium product, bargain item, something else?  This will drive the quality of the materials and how many features you include in the piece.  What does the piece need to do?  How would you like it to look?

Crowdsource It

The thing that kept me up at night on this particular project was the mechanism that allowed the display to spin.  It needed to spin freely and also last for years.  We were initially thinking of having the spinning frame turn on a dowel.  That would require waxing or oiling the dowel, but given that the displays will be all over the country, requiring regular maintenance was not a good plan.  This is where the crowd came in handy.  I pulsed a couple of my fellow woodworkers (read more about plugging into artisans in the post Entrepreneurship and Woodworking Require a Community) and they both suggested a lazy susan mechanism.  Speaking of which…

Experiment

We tried a small two inch square lazy susan bearing set, which just didn’t give enough stability and went with a large 9″ round bearing set from Triangle Manufacturing on the frozen tundra of Oshkosh, Wisconsin.  The wider stance of 9″ versus 4″ made a big difference and minimized wobble.  Remember when we wrote about failing fast and failing cheap (click here to read How to Fail Fast and Fail Cheap in Woodworking, Entrepreneurship, and Life)?  The bearings weren’t terribly expensive and it was worth it to burn through a couple and find the right one.

We’re in the process of iterating on a four sided model now that will also have display space for bracelets and bangles, so I’m sure we’ll have more to follow!  Stay tuned…

How to Refinish Those Old Oak Bannisters with Java Gel Stain to Give Them Some Pop!

refinished bannister with General Finishes Java Gel Stain
The Refinished Bannister

Mrs Woodworker and I finally pulled the trigger and had the carpet and linoleum floors in the house replaced on the first and second floors with hardwood floors.  This house was one of our rentals and after four sets of tenants (who were great, by the way!) the carpet and linoleum were just worn out.  After the floors were replaced, the next step was to update the bannister and kitchen cabinets to match.  I’ll tell you everything you need to know to update the bannisters and will do another post on the kitchen cabinets.

Given that the floors are a java-colored bamboo, we decided to go with a  java stain on the bannister top rail and vertical posts to match the floor.  For the spindles we went with a white semi-gloss paint to match the trim in the rest of the room.

the old oak bannister
The Old Oak Bannister

So where do you start?  It all starts with a lot of sanding.  I recommend investing in an electric sander if you don’t already have one.  This  will save you a ton of time.  I already had a Festool Rotex 150 Random Orbit Sander which was a little big for a job like this, but worked out alright.  If you are buying from scratch, a small sander from Home Depot or Lowes will work.  I recommend using 120 grit sandpaper which matches the grit called for with the stain we used (more on that later).  For those hard-to-reach areas, you will have to do a little hand sanding.  I’m not going to lie; you’ll need to sand all the intricate curves on the spindles by hand.  Turn on your favorite podcast and the time will fly by!  One tip which may help you, is to sand when you have natural light on the bannister.  Then if you see any shine (remaining finish), it’s easy to see where to focus your sanding energy.  Once everything is sanded down nicely, be sure to vacuum really well so no sanding dust gets in the finish.

Before you start applying the finishes, I need to say a few words about ventilation.  The fumes from the stain and varnish were not too bad, but I recommend running your ceiling fans and opening the windows during and after you apply the finishes.  The fumes from the varnish were the strongest  and most important to keep ventilated.  Also, I recommend wearing a dust mask when sanding since you’ll have a lot of fine particles in the air and you don’t want to inhale them.

General Finishes Java Gel Stain and Arm-R-Seal
General Finishes Java Gel Stain and Arm-R-Seal

Next, it’s time to apply the stain.  We used General Finishes Java Gel Stain.  A quart runs about $22.99 at Woodcraft and is plenty for a job of this size.  You can also purchase it for $33.95 with Amazon Prime (click here) and have it delivered right to your door.  It’s very easy to apply and leaves a beautiful color.  To apply, make sure you are wearing gloves then apply the stain using a small rag.  Cut up T-shirts work great for this.  For the tough-to-reach corners, use a small foam brush.  Let the stain sit for about 5-10 minutes then wipe off with a clean rag so it doesn’t leave any splotches.  If you like the color depth at that point, you’re done with the stain.  If you would like a darker color, then apply more coats until you have the color you like.

Our floors have ever-so-slight streaks of lighter color so I only went with one coat of stain on the bannisters.  This left light streaks on the bannister to match the floor.  If your floor is solid, you may want to go with two or three coats of stain.

Next, apply the top coat.  I’ve used General Finishes Arm-R-Seal for years on our Traughber Design projects and it provides a very durable finish.  I typically use the gloss finish when making furniture (see the post How to Make a Beautiful Custom Wooden Mitered Picture Frame for an example of a high gloss finish), but in this case went with the satin finish ($17.99 at Woodcraft).  Why?  Because the bannister rail is a high traffic item and the wear of hands going up and down the stairs on a gloss finish would look unusual over time.  For example, the areas of high traffic would wear to a dull finish and low traffic parts of the rail would still be high gloss.  It would look very uneven.  With the satin finish the rails should have a consistent finish, even after wear.  We went with two coats using small rags to wipe it on.  Make sure you leave at least 24 hours between coats and sand with a high grit sandpaper between coats..  We used 600 grit sandpaper.

Last, paint the spindles.  We went with Sherwin Williams Interior White Semi-Gloss from Lowes.  That’s probably a little more high-end than you need and just about any white semi-gloss interior latex should do the trick.  A quart should be more than enough.  I used a foam brush for a test section, but it was just too slow and I switched to a 2 inch brush.  After two coats and some touch up, the spindles look great.

Check out the pictures.  We think the bannisters look much better than when we started.  Stay tuned for another post soon on how to redo those kitchen cabinets!

Reflections on 2017…Merry Christmas and Happy New Year from Traughber Design!

40 Degrees? No problem.
40 Degrees? No problem.

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to all of our clients, friends, and family!  Traughber Design just delivered its final sale of 2017 last week, and we thought this was a good time to thank our community of supporters and reflect on the past year.

This was our third full year of operation and the business is now profitable!  We invested quite a bit in tools the first year, and we continued to build our client base the second year.  This year we delivered 17 commissions (plus one pro bono project) with a wide variety of projects and have 1 commission in progress in the shop.

Traffic continues to grow to the blog and we have had over 2,800 unique visitors and 5,900 page views.  We’ve published almost 60 posts now and have many more ideas for posts in 2018.

One of the biggest things I’ve learned over this 3 year journey is persistence.  Most small businesses fail, and I wonder how many were on the cusp of success if their owners had just kept at it.  Speaking of which, I’m grinding my way through David McCullough’s 1100 page biography (called “Truman“) of Harry S. Truman and the President’s persistence when everyone wrote him off is absolutely stunning.  Check out this passage from the book which references a Newsweek poll of the biggest writers of the day:  “Of the writers polled, not one thought Truman would win. The vote was unanimous, 50 for Dewey, 0 for Truman.  “The landslide for Dewey will sweep the country,’ the magazine announced.  Further, the Republicans would keep control in the Senate and increase their majority in the House.  The election was as good as over.”  As we all know from the history books, Truman won the election in 1948.  He never gave up.  The same goes for a small business; you have to believe you are going to win, just as Harry S. Truman did in 1948.

As I’ve mentioned in previous blog posts, please continue to support your local artisan ecosystem.  Local small businesses are all tied together and a dollar spent with Traughber Design flows to other businesses, like hardwood dealers, tool vendors, glass manufacturers, etc.  Along those lines, I’d like to give a shout out to Hardwoods in the Rough up in Manassas (and their Facebook page is here).  They have only been open a year, and I was impressed with their customer service when buying some figured walnut the other day.  I hope they stick around for awhile since they are the nearest hardwood dealer to us.

Looking forward, soon the Air Force will be kicking me out after 30 years of service, and I’m excited to pursue Traughber Design full time.  I will be on terminal leave at the end of 2018, and we will see what other exciting commissions come our way.

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year everyone!

How to Build a Little Free Library

little free library
Little Free Library (and Model)

Traughber Design was pleased to recently deliver its latest creation, a Little Free Library, to the Horicon Marsh Education & Visitor Center in Horicon Wisconsin.  If you haven’t heard of the Little Free Library movement that’s sweeping the nation, I’ll give you a quick overview of the revolution, talk about the glorious new Horicon Marsh Education & Visitor Center, then wrap up with some crucial tips for making a little free library.

The Little Free Library Revolution

You may have already seen a Little Free Library  in your neighborhood since there are now over 60,000 Little Free Libraries worldwide and they are in all 50 states and over 80 countries.  The concept is simple.  You take a book you’re interested in from the library and/or leave a book of your own:  easy.  If you make a Little Free Library, you may want to consider registering it so more people will know about it.  Apparently, some people are making pilgrimages to as many of these libraries as they can.  For more on Little Free Libraries visit the official website at littlefreelibrary.org.  There are also many plans on this site if you would like to build your own, and you can even order prebuilt kits.

The Horicon Marsh Education & Visitor Center

The location for this particular Little Free Library is an interesting one.  It’s at the new Horicon Marsh Education & Visitor Center and will allow visitors to “check out” bird books before they hit the trails behind the center.  You can check out the Center’s website here.  The staff at the Center was very supportive of installing this library to commemorate Jerome R. Traughber (Dad), who passed away in 2017, and who was a big supporter of the Center (and reading in general).  If you get a chance, I highly recommend hiking the nature trails behind the Center and also checking out some of the exhibits inside.  For much more on the memorial site and to see much better photography than mine, I highly recommend the blog Horicon Marsh Nature Photography.

How to Make A Little Free Library

This project was a lot of fun to make.  We started with a basic design from Wood Magazine (click here for the link), then made several significant modifications.  Wood Magazine also has a comprehensive YouTube video if reading plans is not your thing.  Click here for the video.  If you are looking for plans, I recommend Googling “little free library plan” on Google or searching those terms on  YouTube.  As mentioned earlier, littlefreelibrary.org has plans as well.

The original plan called for 3/4 inch plywood, but since this library was going to be so visible, we decided to upgrade with cedar for a couple reasons.  Cedar is a little more pleasing to the eye than plain plywood, and holds stain well.  In addition, cedar is insect resistant and should last longer than plywood.

Since cedar boards are not as wide as plywood, you will need to join several 8 inch cedar boards together to get boards that are wide enough.  We used our trusty mortise and tenon joints for extra strength to join the boards along with TiteBond III glue which is well suited to the outdoors.  For more tips on glue technique, check out our post Woodworking Glue Technique, a Metephor for Life.

One quirk of the plan was that it called for an 1/8 inch (or. 125 inch) acrylic window.  Acrylic doesn’t typically come in that width, so we used .08 inch acrylic instead, which introduced a variable you need to be careful of.  Since the acrylic was thinner than called for in the plan, the wooden stop blanks (the thin pieces of wood that hold the acrylic in place) that were to hold them left a slight gap.  Looking back on it, I should have made wider stop blanks, but I was committed at that point, and going back to remill and stain the blanks would have taken a long time.  To ensure you don’t have any visible unstained cedar, including cedar you think is going to be underneath the acrylic, make sure you eyeball the stop blanks from every angle including from within the door and outside the door, or else some unstained wood will be slightly visible through the door.  I was able to easily adjust for this by staining the stop blanks on all sides, which is usually not necessary.

As far as the stain, we tried a redwood stain, but it was a little too “orange” for my taste so we went with the rosewood stain in the original plan.  Always stain a test piece first.  This is part of the fail fast and fail cheap mantra we talked about in our post How to Fail Fast and Fail Cheap in Woodworking, Entrepreneurship, and Life.  Stain is so variable from wood type to wood type that a test piece is a must.  Rarely does stain look like the color palettes you get in the store.

Last, we decided to go with a cedar shingle roof to add some pizzazz and make it blend in with the natural environment.  I had considered asphalt shingles, but when I was poking around the hardware store noticed some cedar shingles that I thought would look much nicer.  To make the shingles, I used cedar shims and laid them out to hang over the edge of the library about a half inch.  I also left about 4 inches exposed in each layer.  I highly recommend the video How to Install Cedar Shake Shingles on YouTube before starting out.  After the shingles were nailed and glued, I added a cap using cedar with a bevel equal to the angle of the roof (see the video).  I screwed the cap on the library using deck screws then coated the shingles with Thompson’s clear stain.

little free library Horicon Marsh Education Center
Little Free Library at Horicon Marsh Education & Visitor Center

This is a view of the Little Free Library as you approach the front door of the Center and you can see the beautiful Horicon Marsh in the background.  If you are ever in Wisconsin, I highly recommend visiting the Horicon Marsh Education & Visitor Center.

 

Rumor has it, there will be a bike trail going from Mayville to the Center soon, then another trail going to Horicon which will connect to the 34 mile Wild Goose Trail.  If you are a rails-to-trails fan, this will be right up your alley, since the Wild Goose Trail is a rail trail (see the link here for more on Rails to Trails).  This new trail should open up the Center for even more visitors to enjoy and spur an innovation boom in Horicon and Mayville (see our post Having a Mental Block with a Thorny Woodworking or Start-Up Problem? Get on the Bike!)

If you get a chance to build a little free library, go for it!  I’d be glad to answer any questions via this blog post’s comments section or the Contact Us page.

Entrepreneur Innovation: How to Make Your Woodworking Dazzle with Epoxy Resin

Black Resin Filling a Void
Black resin filling a void.  Unfilled on left.  Filled and finished on right.

One of the things I’ve learned as an entrepreneur is to keep innovating and experimenting.  Some things work out and others, not so much.  You just press on.  One of the recent experiments I’ve tried was using epoxy resin to fill in voids in my work.  Ever wonder how they get those really awesome thick “bar top” finishes on tables and bar tops?  In many cases, those are epoxy resin finishes (click here if you’d like to do more research on epoxy resins).  Resin is also very useful for dealing with knot holes, cracks, and other voids.  I recently took the dive into experimenting with resin finishes and thought I’d share some lessons learned to help you get started.  I’ll also provide specific product recommendations you can purchase directly from Amazon and have delivered right to your door.

The most important step is protect yourself before beginning.  These finishes are very toxic so make sure you are in a well-ventilated area.  When I applied my first resin finish it was in the basement shop, so I flung the outer door wide open to let the air in and applied the finish at a table that was very near the door.  In addition, make sure you are wearing long sleeves and are wearing gloves.  You definitely don’t want this stuff on your skin.  I also recommend wearing safety glasses, just in case you splash some up toward your face. This is not likely with the resin since it’s so viscous, but might happen with the hardener or dye.

The materials you’ll need are the resin, a hardener, and dye.  The particular resin I’ve been using (System Three’s MirrorCoat) is mixed two parts resin to one part hardener (also MirrorCoat).  One of the advantages of MirrorCoat is that it’s clear, so you can add dye (I’m using TransTint’s product) to make it any color you like.  I chose black because I was filling in some voids in the black walnut gun cabinet I’ve been telling you about.  Clear resin without the dye might make for an interesting finish in the black walnut as well. Here is the list of materials with links to Amazon if you’d like to purchase them:

Resin and hardener click here
Dye click here

I also recommend a plastic cup, measuring spoon, and scrap stick to use as an applicator.  If you wipe the measuring spoon carefully with a paper towel, you can reuse the measuring spoon indefinitely.  I like to use a plastic cup because it’s disposable and doesn’t require clean up.  I’ve tried a couple different applicators, and a long thin piece of scrap wood seems to work just about as well as anything else.

The procedure.  This stuff is very expensive so you only want to use the bare minimum required.  I recommend finding a piece of scrap wood with a small knot hole to practice on.  A small knot will not require much resin to fill in.  During my first experiment I used two 1/4 teaspoons of resin, one 1/4 teaspoon of hardener, and one drop of dye.  Start by pouring the resin into the cup.  Then add the hardener.  Then add the dye until the color has the opacity you like.  Mix with the scrap stick and let one drop fall from the scrap stick into your void.  Then add another drop, then another until the void has been filled.  You want to slowly add drops, rather than pouring the resin so the air has time to escape and the resin has time to slowly fill all the gaps in the void.  Fill the void to the top then wait about 5 minutes to check it again.  You’ll probably have some settling.  Then add more resin to top off the void.  The resin will take about 24 hours to set and 72 hours to cure completely.

This is very important:  make sure you set aside a time period when you have a few days in a row to check on the settling of the resin. You’ll typically find that overnight the resin has settled, and you’ll need to add some more the next day to level it off with your wood surface.  If you wait more than 24 hours to do this, your resin may not bond together and you could end up with air gaps in your resin which would create an issue during sanding.

The finish.  You may have a slightly convex shape over the void, but not to worry.  You can sand the resin just like you sand the surrounding wood.  I like to use 80 grit, then 120, then 180 as discussed in the post about my go-to finish on the cherry coat rack.  As you can see from the picture, the resin really added some pizzaz to what could have been a distracting knot hole.

One caveat:  the directions recommend using a propane torch to heat the resin and pop any air bubbles at the surface, but I’ve found that in the proportions recommended, the air bubbles escape before the resin hardens.

If you haven’t tried resin, but have always wanted to, give it a shot.  For less than $70 you can be up and running in no time.  This is consistent with our entrepreneurial mantra of fail fast and fail cheap which we wrote about here.  If you have any questions, post below.  I look forward to hearing from you about your experience with resin finishes.

 

Product Review: Granberg Alaskan Mark IV Portable Chain Saw Mill

Granberg Sawmill
Granberg Saw Mill

How cool would it be to mill your own wood directly from the source?  Very cool, indeed.  I had the opportunity to do just that the other day when fellow woodworker, Jacob Hummitzsch, and I tried out the Granberg Mark IV Alaskan Portable Chain Saw Mill to cut some slabs out of a downed white oak nearby.  If you are considering sourcing your own wood, I highly recommend it.  Here is some of the intel on the Granberg:

 

Advantages

White Oak from Sawmill
White Oak from Sawmill

End Result.  As you can see from the picture at the left, there is minimal waviness in the boards we cut.  If you use a large bandsaw, which is typical for this kind of work, there can be some pretty significant waves in the wood to deal with.  The slabs we cut with the Granberg should be very easy to plane.  The boards we cut were as large as 16 inches across and my planer can only handle 12 inches, so if I want to keep the entire width would need to take the boards to a hardwood dealer or sawyer for planing, OR I could build a rig using a router to plane the wood.  I’ll likely go the router route at some point in the future when I get more into making table tops.

Granberg in Action
Granberg in Action

Ease of Use.  Once we got the hang of it, cutting slabs was a breeze.  You just lean forward and rock the saw a bit from side to side, so the entire saw blade is not engaged with the log and it’s easier on the chainsaw to make the cut.  The Granberg can easily be maneuvered by one person, but it’s a good idea to have a Wingman tapping in wedges behind you to keep the void behind the saw open as you cut.  It’s also good to have a Wingman to alternate cutting slabs with you because it does get tiring.

Cost.  In only 2 hours we cut six boards which were 1.5 inches thick, 16 inches wide, and 64 inches long.  That works out to about 65 board feet.  The last time I bought white oak (which I selected and costs more), it was $9.90 per board foot.  Jacob’s and my little expedition netted over $600 in retail white oak with a couple caveats.  One caveat is that our wood is not kiln dried and will require some time and space to dry out.  Another caveat is that the white oak I purchased was S2S grade (read our post here about wood grades), and the slabs we cut will need some additional milling, particularly planing.  However, for the cost of the Granberg and the chain saw we saved hundreds of dollars.  Over several years, this could add up to thousands saved.  If you read our post on pricing your work, you can see that sharply reducing your expenses over the long haul can really add up.  Could Mrs Woodworker be right when she says she saves money when she goes shopping?  Nah.

Controlling entire supply chain.  There is a lot to be said for sourcing your own wood, since you are controlling the level of quality from start to finish.  In addition, you can select trees with unique characteristics, and dry them in a method you know and trust.  You can also be more selective in which boards are used for which purpose which is an important aspect of craftsmanship.  In building our current commission, the black walnut gun cabinet, it was important to have half a dozen raw 8 foot boards to choose from so I could match grain and color for different parts of the cabinet. If you are sourcing your own wood, you will have a much larger selection of grain and color to choose from.

Cons

Stability at Beginning and End of Cut.  One of the disadvantages we saw was that when you first start cutting and when are at the end of the cut, the saw can flop around a bit because there is not as much of the frame to rest on the log.  Once the saw gets going, the entire frame is resting on the log.  There may be extensions available to mitigate this, but we didn’t have any and had to eyeball it a bit to make sure the saw was horizontal.

Sawmill with Chainsaw
Sawmill with Chainsaw

Saw Sharpening.  This is not really the Granberg’s fault, but we had to sharpen the saw after every two boards, or so.  We sharpened it by hand, and can probably speed this up with an electric sharpener.  There are four bolts to loosen, so freeing then tightening the saw did not take too long.  It’s important to take the time to sharpen the saw, or you’ll be wasting your time over the long haul (see our post about efficiency and sharpening the saw here).  Here is a link to some sharpeners available on Amazon.

Storage.  As you can imagine, storing many boards that are around a foot wide and eight feet long will take up a lot of space.  Given that my current shop is in half of the garage, I don’t have much room for storage.  If you have some land, this may not be an issue and you could store your wood in a shed, or outside if it is covered with a tarp.

If you’re looking to mill a lot of wood, for example to build a house, a larger portable saw mill like a Wood Mizer might be more appropriate.  Jesse and Alyssa at Pure Living For Life have a great video on their experience with using one of these larger mills (in this case, the Wood Mizer LT15).  Click here for the video.  We referenced their journey in our post on the RSS hack and they seem to be making a lot of progress in their journey to living off-grid and debt free.

Overall, I’d give a “buy” recommendation for the Granberg.  It was a lot of fun to use and can save a serious woodworker hundreds, and maybe thousands, of dollars in the long run.

Update on Wood Shop Transformation: We Survived the Move!

wood shop work flow
Wood Shop Work Flow

Other than the moving truck ramming the house 2 weeks ago (more on that later), our move went pretty well. We declared Initial Operating Capability on the wood shop and are in the process of wiping varnish on the gun cabinet commission we posted about here and here. We have drying parts scattered all over the garage, so I’m a little reluctant to finish setting up the wood shop for fear of kicking up dust which could mar the finish. There is nothing like wiping finish on a raw piece of black walnut because it magically transforms the wood from a dusty light grey color to a lustrous, rich dark brown/grey.  Once all the finish is dry, I’ll get to work putting the shop into its final configuration then we can declare Full Operational Capability.

I thought I’d take this opportunity to talk more about the design of a wood shop from scratch. I wrote about this earlier (click here), and my thinking has evolved some. We’ve had to move the shop three times now since we started Traughber Design in 2015 so we’re getting more experience in moving than I’d like!  The diagram at the top lays out the overall scheme, and we’re going with a counterclockwise flow around the shop. The raw lumber will go immediately onto the lumber racks at the right of the garage when I return from runs to the hardwood dealer. The next tools that typically touch the wood would be the planer, track saw, and sliding compound miter saw, so I’ll have those next to the raw wood. Routing is usually near the end of the process so we’ll have the router table near the end of the loop. In the middle, against the house, will be the assembly table. At the very end, we’ll have some shelves to display finished pieces for visitors to the shop.  One of the primary things I’ve learned over the years is to take advantage of the sun, fresh air, and view outside of the garage, so I’ll have the Festool MFT/3 (Multi Function Table) work table near the outer door since that’s where I do most of the work.  In addition, I invested in an anti-fatigue mat, which has helped greatly with standing on concrete, and that will go in front of the MFT/3.

site of new Traughber Design wood shop
Site of New Traughber Design Wood Shop

The picture at left shows the almost empty garage when we moved in.  As you can see, the first thing we moved was the commission in progress (the cabinet) and the Festool MFT/3 work table so we could keep working on the project during the move.  The tenants took good care of the garage before their move to Germany, so we don’t have to make many modifications.

New Work Bench
New Work Bench

This picture is of the workbench I built against the house. That was one of the first tasks after moving in because the workbench is an “enabler” which allows so many other tasks to be done.  My pal, Tim Ferriss, talks about how it’s important to identify the “first domino” in any endeavor which knocks down all the others.  The work bench is one of those first dominos, since it speeds up getting other tasks done. Luckily I had kept all the pieces from the workbench and marked them before dismantling it years ago at a tenant’s request since they wanted to move a boat into the garage.  Putting it back together was a snap.

Once we get all the finish applied to the gun cabinet (five coats with sanding in between), we’ll put everything in its final configuration.

Back to the moving truck saga…I can’t get into the particulars too much since we are working the claim with the mover’s insurance company, but suffice it to say a lack of situational awareness caused the moving truck to be backed into our new house. All is well. The mover’s company said the claim was legit and we should be able to kick off the repair work soon.

What lessons learned have YOU had from setting up your wood shop?

3 Entrepreneur Lessons Learned on My Woodworking Expedition to the Korean Furniture Museum

Korea Furniture Museum
Korea Furniture Museum

I just got back from a 6,000 mile woodworking expedition to the Korean Furniture Museum in Seoul and learned several valuable entrepreneur lessons I’d like to share with you.  OK, maybe that’s a stretch.  We went to Korea for my day job and had some time to kill before our return flight and took the opportunity to research some woodworking designs.  The mission’s intent was sound, but it quickly took some interesting turns.  Here are a few lessons learned from the expedition:

Lesson #1:  Surround Yourself with Positive, Like-Minded People

Given our government-mandated return flight time, we had some time to kill in Seoul, so I figured I’d tour the Korean Furniture Museum for some design ideas.  The Lonely Planet Guide for Seoul recommended it and it seemed interesting.  One of my colleagues, Rich Davis (see interview with him here), tagged along since we are both on artisan journeys:  mine in woodworking and Rich’s in photography.  Our first task was to figure out the Korean subway system.  I’d ridden it a few years ago, but was a little rusty.  Fortunately, the digital kiosks had an English option and we were able to quickly purchase a couple tickets and be on our way.  A couple subway stops later we got off and started walking toward the museum which the Guide said was on a beautiful hilltop location.  It was a pretty warm day and as we climbed, and climbed, and climbed we realized we weren’t seeing any more signs for the museum and were lost (more on that in #2 below).

At this point, Rich could have started cussing me out, but he understood it was all part of the journey.  If I hadn’t had him along, I might have thrown in the towel and headed back to the subway station.  That’s why it’s important to surround yourself with like-minded people.  They will encourage you to keep pressing on.

Lesson #2:  People Want to Help You

So there we were, lost in Seoul, but we saw a police “box” which is an extremely small outpost for a policeman or two to stand in.  I figured “what’s the worst that can happen” and went to ask for directions.  The two Korean policemen were extremely young, maybe around 18, and I had no idea if they spoke English.  Luckily, even though they didn’t think so, their English was very good.  One of them even drew a map on my guide book to the museum.  We followed his map and ran into another police box.  The policeman there gave us the final directions and we finally made it to the museum.

I’ve traveled to at least two dozen countries and have found that people, in general, are very friendly and are willing to help you out.  This is a good lesson for entrepreneurs:  if you are stuck, ask for help.

Lesson #3:  Never Quit

We got the museum and asked the security guard about tickets.  He made a chopping motion with one arm against his forearm.  He was either a Seminoles fan or something was amiss.  He was on older gentleman who didn’t speak any English and flagged down a co-worker.  She told us the museum was closed!  According to the guidebook, we were there during normal hours, but apparently they were going through some renovations or something.  Rich and I laughed it off and starting heading back down the hill.  We went back to our hotel and rehydrated with a couple of cold ones.  Rich was able to climb the hill near the hotel at sunset and snap some cool time lapse photographs from the old city wall, so the day wasn’t a total loss.

This could have been a very disappointing afternoon, but the way we looked at, it was just one event in a very long journey to create.  In addition, we’re likely to go back to Korea again next year and can give it another shot.

There you have it:  surround yourself with like-minded people, ask for help when you need it, and never quit.  And by the way, if you are ever in Seoul, please let me know how the Korean Furniture Museum is ; )